Video-enhanced follow-up training improves basic life support skills retention in laypersons: A prospective randomized controlled trial

Kyoung Min You, Jonghwan Shin, Se Jong Lee, Hui Jai Lee, Jin Hee Jung, Yeong Ju Son, Seong Youn Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Retraining and retention for basic life support skills after initial basic life support education are important for high-quality basic life support performance at the scene. Objectives: We investigated whether delivery of a personal-training video clip reduced basic life support skill degradation in laypersons. Methods: After a basic life support layperson training course, the participants were randomized to the video group and control group. The layperson learners in the video group were provided with a video clip of themselves during basic life support education course and a follow-up text message every 3 months after initial basic life support course. The control group only received a follow-up text message every 3 months, without a video clip. The performances of all participants were reviewed initially and after 12 months in each group. Results: The total number of participants was 186. Among them, 22 in the video group and 29 in the control group completed the follow-up and final basic life support skill tests. In the control group, basic life support skill level of the participants was at 60.1% after 12 months compared with the initial test and 79.8% in the video group. The performance differences in each basic life support skill score between the initial and follow-up test at 12 months were significantly different between the video group and control group: non-compression, 0.0 (0.0–1.0) versus 1.0 (1.0–2.0); compression, 1.0 (0.0–1.3) versus 1.0 (0.0–4.0); automated external defibrillator, 2.0 (1.0–3.0) versus 3.0 (2.0–4.5) and total score, 4.0 (2.0–5.0) versus 6.0 (3.0–9.5), respectively (all p-values < 0.05). Conclusion: Delivery of a basic life support personal-training video clip to laypersons who received basic life support training can reduce performance degradation at 12 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-381
Number of pages9
JournalHong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • education
  • pre-hospital
  • resuscitation
  • training

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