Use of stem cells as alternative methods to animal experimentation in predictive toxicology

Tae Won Kim, Jeong Hwan Che, Jun Won Yun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a major role of experimental animals in development of biomedical research, there has been historical controversy surrounding animal research. Along with a strategy of 3Rs, various in vitro methods have been suggested to replace potentially painful animal experiments. In this review, we summarize the use of stem cells as an alternative of animal experimentation in predictive toxicology. There have been continuing researches on stem cells and stem cell-derived tissue-specific cells to develop alternative methods/biomarkers for animal toxicity testing including developmental toxicity, genotoxicity, and tissue-specific toxicity. Along with unique abilities of stem cells including self-renewal, infinite proliferation, and differentiation into multiple lineages, human stem cell-based in vitro systems have been proven valuable to increase predictive power of toxicology through providing with better scientific information related to toxic risks in humans without inter-species variability. In particular, stem cells including induced pluripotent stem cell-based system for personalized toxicological assessment could be a better option as an in vitro model system in comparison with immortalized cells with abnormal phenotype or primary cells with small quantity and batch-to-batch variation. This review will be useful for understanding the current status and future direction in using stem cells as an alternative non-animal method for predictive toxicology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-29
Number of pages15
JournalRegulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Stem cells
Toxicology
Animals
Stem Cells
Toxicity
Stem Cell Research
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Poisons
Tissue
Biomedical Research
Biomarkers
Phenotype
In Vitro Techniques
Testing

Keywords

  • Adult stem cell
  • Alternative method
  • Embryonic stem cell
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells
  • Mesenchymal stem cell
  • Toxicity

Cite this

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Use of stem cells as alternative methods to animal experimentation in predictive toxicology. / Kim, Tae Won; Che, Jeong Hwan; Yun, Jun Won.

In: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, Vol. 105, 01.07.2019, p. 15-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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