Treatment patterns of thrombopoietin receptor agonists among adults with primary immune thrombocytopenia: A Korean nationwide population-based study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) are a reliable second-line immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) treatment. Despite an increase in use of TPO-RAs, the treatment pattern among adults with ITP is not well understood. Materials and methods: From January 2015 to December 2018, ITP patients were identified using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. Results: Of the total 3885 adult patients with ITP, 1745 (44.9%) required treatment, with a median follow-up duration of 31.4 months (range, 0.1–59.8 months). Of these, 46.5% and 36.6% continued treatment for more than 6 months and more than 12 months, respectively. Corticosteroids were the most common first-line therapy. Of the treated patients, 83 (4.8%) received TPO-RAs (eltrombopag, 86.7%; romiplostim, 13.3%). The median age of the group treated with TPO-RAs was 62 years, 62.6% were female, and the median time from first diagnosis to initial TPO-RA treatment was 12.5 months (range, 0.4–48.0 months). A total of 52 (62.7%) patients received TPO-RAs as a second-line treatment for ITP. Splenectomy was performed in 19 patients (22.9%) before initiation of TPO-RAs. When clinical efficacy was analyzed before and during TPO-RA use, there was a significant decrease in platelet transfusion and a tendency toward reduced bleeding events. Conclusions: This population-based study is the first to describe the treatment pattern of TPO-RAs for ITP among patients in Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-118
Number of pages5
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume213
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • Primary immune thrombocytopenia
  • Thrombopoietin receptor agonists
  • Treatment

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