Treatment of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation: Should Lobectomy Always Be Performed?

Hong Kwan Kim, Yong Soo Choi, Kwhanmien Kim, Young Mog Shim, Gwan Woo Ku, Kang Mo Ahn, Sang Il Lee, Jhingook Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although parenchyma-saving resection makes it possible to preserve the lung parenchyma, most surgeons are reluctant to perform it for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) because it could also result in recurrent pulmonary infection or residual lesion. This study compared the early and late postoperative outcomes according to the extent of resection in CCAM patients to determine if the extent of resection would influence the short- and long-term results. Methods: Between 1995 and 2006, 45 patients underwent surgical resection for CCAM. Ten patients received a segmentectomy and 2 a wedge resection (the parenchyma-saving group), and 32 received a lobectomy and 1 a pneumonectomy (the lobectomy group). A retrospective analysis was done to compare the early and late postoperative outcomes between two groups. Results: No significant differences were observed for severity and duration of preoperative symptoms. No in-hospital or late deaths occurred. There were no significant differences in the incidence of early postoperative complications and late morbidities between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups for hospital length of stay and duration of chest tube placement. Conclusions: The early and late outcomes were excellent even after parenchyma-saving resection in patients with CCAM. We suggest that parenchyma-saving resection can be safely performed in selected patients with a well-confined CCAM lesion and thereby avoiding pneumonectomy in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-253
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2008

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Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation of Lung
Pneumonectomy
Length of Stay
Therapeutics
Chest Tubes
Lung
Segmental Mastectomy
Morbidity
Incidence
Infection

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Kim, Hong Kwan ; Choi, Yong Soo ; Kim, Kwhanmien ; Shim, Young Mog ; Ku, Gwan Woo ; Ahn, Kang Mo ; Lee, Sang Il ; Kim, Jhingook. / Treatment of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation : Should Lobectomy Always Be Performed?. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 86, No. 1. pp. 249-253.
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Treatment of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation : Should Lobectomy Always Be Performed? / Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Kwhanmien; Shim, Young Mog; Ku, Gwan Woo; Ahn, Kang Mo; Lee, Sang Il; Kim, Jhingook.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 86, No. 1, 01.07.2008, p. 249-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Treatment of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation

T2 - Should Lobectomy Always Be Performed?

AU - Kim, Hong Kwan

AU - Choi, Yong Soo

AU - Kim, Kwhanmien

AU - Shim, Young Mog

AU - Ku, Gwan Woo

AU - Ahn, Kang Mo

AU - Lee, Sang Il

AU - Kim, Jhingook

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