Transient anosmia induces depressive-like and anxiolytic-like behavior and reduces amygdalar corticotropin-releasing hormone in a ZnSO 4 -induced mouse model

Sangzin Ahn, Mooseok Choi, Hyunju Kim, Eun jeong Yang, Usman Mahmood, Seong Il Kang, Hyun Woo Shin, Dae Woo Kim, Hye Sun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Olfactory loss is known to affect both mood and quality of life. Transient anosmia was induced in mice to study the resulting changes in mood, behavior, and on a molecular level. Transient anosmia was induced by a single intranasal instillation of ZnSO 4 in BALB/c mice. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, and potato chip finding test were performed to confirm olfactory loss. Tail suspension, forced swim, and splash tests were performed to evaluate depression-related behavior; while the open field, and elevated plus maze tests were used to evaluate anxiety-related behavior. The mRNA levels of amygdalar corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were quantified using real-time PCR to confirm relevant molecular change. Olfactory loss was confirmed 1-2.5 weeks after induction, and this loss was subsequently reversed over time. The results of the behavioral tests indicated increased depression-like and reduced anxiety-like behavior at week 1. Accordingly, PCR data identified decreased amygdalar CRH expression at week 1. These results suggest that transient anosmia induces both depressive and anxiolytic behavior as a result of decreased amygdalar CRH in a mouse model of anosmia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-221
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Senses
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 23 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Corticotropin-releasing hormone
  • Depression
  • Glucocorticoid receptor
  • Olfactory loss

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