Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence

Su Min Jeong, Dong Wook Shin, Kyungdo Han, Jin Hyung Jung, Sohyun Chun, Hee Won Jung, Ki Young Son

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The timed up-and-go (TUG) test is a validated screening tool to assess fall risk. This study evaluated the association between the TUG test and future fractures, which are a tangible clinical complication of falling. Methods: We included 1,070,320 participants who participated in the National Screening Program for Transitional Ages for Koreans aged 66 years old from 2009 to 2014. Among them, 355,753 women underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. TUG times were classified as <10 s or ≥10 s. The incidence of fractures, including vertebral, hip, and other sites, was determined using claims data from the National Health Information database. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 4.4 ± 1.8 years, participants with slow TUG times had a significantly increased risk of fractures compared with those who had normal TUG times: any fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–1.10), vertebral fracture (aHR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.11–1.16), hip fracture (aHR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.13–1.29), and other fractures (upper arm, forearm, and lower leg; aHR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00–1.05). Among women with bone mineral density (BMD) results, slow TUG performance was associated with an increased risk of fracture independent of BMD. Conclusions: The TUG test, as an indicator of physical performance, can provide information about future fracture risk above that provided by BMD. Conducting the TUG test to assess fracture risk should be considered to improve fracture risk assessment and propose interventions to improve physical performance, thereby reducing fracture risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-481
Number of pages8
JournalBone
Volume127
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Incidence
Bone Density
Confidence Intervals
Accidental Falls
Photon Absorptiometry
Hip Fractures
Forearm
Hip
Leg
Arm
Databases
Health

Keywords

  • Bone mineral density
  • Fracture
  • Timed up-and-go test

Cite this

Jeong, S. M., Shin, D. W., Han, K., Jung, J. H., Chun, S., Jung, H. W., & Son, K. Y. (2019). Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence. Bone, 127, 474-481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.07.018
Jeong, Su Min ; Shin, Dong Wook ; Han, Kyungdo ; Jung, Jin Hyung ; Chun, Sohyun ; Jung, Hee Won ; Son, Ki Young. / Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence. In: Bone. 2019 ; Vol. 127. pp. 474-481.
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abstract = "Purpose: The timed up-and-go (TUG) test is a validated screening tool to assess fall risk. This study evaluated the association between the TUG test and future fractures, which are a tangible clinical complication of falling. Methods: We included 1,070,320 participants who participated in the National Screening Program for Transitional Ages for Koreans aged 66 years old from 2009 to 2014. Among them, 355,753 women underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. TUG times were classified as <10 s or ≥10 s. The incidence of fractures, including vertebral, hip, and other sites, was determined using claims data from the National Health Information database. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 4.4 ± 1.8 years, participants with slow TUG times had a significantly increased risk of fractures compared with those who had normal TUG times: any fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.08, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–1.10), vertebral fracture (aHR = 1.14, 95{\%} CI = 1.11–1.16), hip fracture (aHR = 1.21, 95{\%} CI = 1.13–1.29), and other fractures (upper arm, forearm, and lower leg; aHR = 1.02, 95{\%} CI = 1.00–1.05). Among women with bone mineral density (BMD) results, slow TUG performance was associated with an increased risk of fracture independent of BMD. Conclusions: The TUG test, as an indicator of physical performance, can provide information about future fracture risk above that provided by BMD. Conducting the TUG test to assess fracture risk should be considered to improve fracture risk assessment and propose interventions to improve physical performance, thereby reducing fracture risk.",
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Jeong, SM, Shin, DW, Han, K, Jung, JH, Chun, S, Jung, HW & Son, KY 2019, 'Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence', Bone, vol. 127, pp. 474-481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.07.018

Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence. / Jeong, Su Min; Shin, Dong Wook; Han, Kyungdo; Jung, Jin Hyung; Chun, Sohyun; Jung, Hee Won; Son, Ki Young.

In: Bone, Vol. 127, 10.2019, p. 474-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence

AU - Jeong, Su Min

AU - Shin, Dong Wook

AU - Han, Kyungdo

AU - Jung, Jin Hyung

AU - Chun, Sohyun

AU - Jung, Hee Won

AU - Son, Ki Young

PY - 2019/10

Y1 - 2019/10

N2 - Purpose: The timed up-and-go (TUG) test is a validated screening tool to assess fall risk. This study evaluated the association between the TUG test and future fractures, which are a tangible clinical complication of falling. Methods: We included 1,070,320 participants who participated in the National Screening Program for Transitional Ages for Koreans aged 66 years old from 2009 to 2014. Among them, 355,753 women underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. TUG times were classified as <10 s or ≥10 s. The incidence of fractures, including vertebral, hip, and other sites, was determined using claims data from the National Health Information database. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 4.4 ± 1.8 years, participants with slow TUG times had a significantly increased risk of fractures compared with those who had normal TUG times: any fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–1.10), vertebral fracture (aHR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.11–1.16), hip fracture (aHR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.13–1.29), and other fractures (upper arm, forearm, and lower leg; aHR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00–1.05). Among women with bone mineral density (BMD) results, slow TUG performance was associated with an increased risk of fracture independent of BMD. Conclusions: The TUG test, as an indicator of physical performance, can provide information about future fracture risk above that provided by BMD. Conducting the TUG test to assess fracture risk should be considered to improve fracture risk assessment and propose interventions to improve physical performance, thereby reducing fracture risk.

AB - Purpose: The timed up-and-go (TUG) test is a validated screening tool to assess fall risk. This study evaluated the association between the TUG test and future fractures, which are a tangible clinical complication of falling. Methods: We included 1,070,320 participants who participated in the National Screening Program for Transitional Ages for Koreans aged 66 years old from 2009 to 2014. Among them, 355,753 women underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. TUG times were classified as <10 s or ≥10 s. The incidence of fractures, including vertebral, hip, and other sites, was determined using claims data from the National Health Information database. Results: During the mean follow-up period of 4.4 ± 1.8 years, participants with slow TUG times had a significantly increased risk of fractures compared with those who had normal TUG times: any fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–1.10), vertebral fracture (aHR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.11–1.16), hip fracture (aHR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.13–1.29), and other fractures (upper arm, forearm, and lower leg; aHR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00–1.05). Among women with bone mineral density (BMD) results, slow TUG performance was associated with an increased risk of fracture independent of BMD. Conclusions: The TUG test, as an indicator of physical performance, can provide information about future fracture risk above that provided by BMD. Conducting the TUG test to assess fracture risk should be considered to improve fracture risk assessment and propose interventions to improve physical performance, thereby reducing fracture risk.

KW - Bone mineral density

KW - Fracture

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Jeong SM, Shin DW, Han K, Jung JH, Chun S, Jung HW et al. Timed up-and-go test is a useful predictor of fracture incidence. Bone. 2019 Oct;127:474-481. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.07.018