The use of specially designed tasks to enhance student interest in the cadaver dissection laboratory

Seok Hoon Kang, Jwaseop Shin, Youngil Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cadaver dissection is a key component of anatomy education. Unfortunately, students sometimes regard the process of dissection as uninteresting or stressful. To make laboratory time more interesting and to encourage discussion and collaborative learning among medical students, specially designed tasks were assigned to students throughout dissection. Student response and the effects of the tasks on examination scores were analyzed. The subjects of this study were 154 medical students who attended the dissection laboratory in 2009. Four tasks were given to teams of seven to eight students over the course of 2 weeks of lower limb dissection. The tasks were designed such that the answers could not be obtained by referencing books or searching the Internet, but rather through careful observation of the cadavers and discussion among team members. Questionnaires were administered. The majority of students agreed that the tasks were interesting (68.0%), encouraged team discussion (76.8%), and facilitated their understanding of anatomy (72.8%). However, they did not prefer that additional tasks be assigned during the other laboratory sessions. When examination scores of those who responded positively were compared with those who responded neutrally or negatively, no statistically significant differences could be found. In conclusion, the specially designed tasks assigned to students in the cadaver dissection laboratory encouraged team discussion and collaborative learning, and thereby generated interest in laboratory work. However, knowledge acquisition was not improved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-82
Number of pages7
JournalAnatomical Sciences Education
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2012

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Cadaver
Dissection
Students
Medical Students
Anatomy
Learning
Internet
Lower Extremity
Observation
Education

Keywords

  • Anatomy curriculum
  • Cadaver dissection
  • Collaborative learning
  • Encouraging discussions
  • Gross anatomy education
  • Gross anatomy laboratory
  • Korean medical education
  • Team-based task

Cite this

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The use of specially designed tasks to enhance student interest in the cadaver dissection laboratory. / Kang, Seok Hoon; Shin, Jwaseop; Hwang, Youngil.

In: Anatomical Sciences Education, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 76-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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