The Effects of Employment Conditions on Smoking Status and Smoking Intensity: The Analysis of Korean Labor & Income Panel 8th-10th Wave

Youn Jung, Juhwan Oh, Soonim Huh, Ichiro Kawachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The neoliberal policies and its socioeconomic consequences in Korea have made employment conditions insecure and affected employees' health as well. Methods and Findings: To examine the association between employment condition and smoking status, we selected male respondents aged 20-59 that participated in all of the 8th-10th wave of Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS) which is a nationally representative data. Precarious working was significantly associated with smoking compared to standard working even after adjusting for socioeconomic indicators and self rated health status. After controlling for overall life satisfaction, the odds ratio of smoking among precarious workers decreased, but it was still marginally significant (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.99 to 2.07). A relation between precarious working and heavy smoking was also significant. Precarious working was associated with a decreased likelihood of quitting smoking, while it was not significant any more after adjusting for overall satisfaction on life. Precarious work was also related to a higher likelihood of relapse among former smokers, but was not significant after adjusting for other confounders. Conclusions: Precarious workers were more likely to be smokers and heavy smokers than standard workers. Unemployment is also a significant risk factor for decreased quitting and smoking relapse. However, insecure employment was an even more consistent determinant of current smoking behavior than unemployment.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere57109
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Feb 2013

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unemployment
labor
income
Smoking
relapse
Personnel
socioeconomics
Health
Unemployment
health status
odds ratio
human resources
Korean Peninsula
risk factors
Recurrence
Occupational Health
Korea
Health Status
Odds Ratio
methodology

Cite this

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title = "The Effects of Employment Conditions on Smoking Status and Smoking Intensity: The Analysis of Korean Labor & Income Panel 8th-10th Wave",
abstract = "Background: The neoliberal policies and its socioeconomic consequences in Korea have made employment conditions insecure and affected employees' health as well. Methods and Findings: To examine the association between employment condition and smoking status, we selected male respondents aged 20-59 that participated in all of the 8th-10th wave of Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS) which is a nationally representative data. Precarious working was significantly associated with smoking compared to standard working even after adjusting for socioeconomic indicators and self rated health status. After controlling for overall life satisfaction, the odds ratio of smoking among precarious workers decreased, but it was still marginally significant (OR = 1.43, 95{\%} CI = 0.99 to 2.07). A relation between precarious working and heavy smoking was also significant. Precarious working was associated with a decreased likelihood of quitting smoking, while it was not significant any more after adjusting for overall satisfaction on life. Precarious work was also related to a higher likelihood of relapse among former smokers, but was not significant after adjusting for other confounders. Conclusions: Precarious workers were more likely to be smokers and heavy smokers than standard workers. Unemployment is also a significant risk factor for decreased quitting and smoking relapse. However, insecure employment was an even more consistent determinant of current smoking behavior than unemployment.",
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The Effects of Employment Conditions on Smoking Status and Smoking Intensity : The Analysis of Korean Labor & Income Panel 8th-10th Wave. / Jung, Youn; Oh, Juhwan; Huh, Soonim; Kawachi, Ichiro.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 2, e57109, 20.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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