The Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency Correction on the Outcomes in Women After Carpal Tunnel Release

Myung Ho Lee, Hyun Sik Gong, Min Ho Lee, Kwan Jae Cho, Ji Hyeung Kim, Goo Hyun Baek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation improves myelination and recovery after nerve injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether correction of vitamin D level leads to better surgical outcomes in women with both carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and vitamin D deficiency. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 84 vitamin D–deficient women with CTS who underwent carpal tunnel release and then received daily vitamin D supplementation of 1,000 IU vitamin D for 6 months. We also reviewed 35 control patients who were vitamin D–nondeficient at baseline and thus did not receive the supplementation. At baseline and 6 months after surgery, we measured serum vitamin D levels, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, motor conduction velocity, and grip and pinch strengths. We compared the outcomes of CTS related to vitamin D levels. We also correlated baseline and follow-up vitamin D levels with the assessed parameters. Results: At 6 months, 59 patients became vitamin D–nondeficient (≥ 20 ng/mL) and 25 were still vitamin D–deficient (< 20 ng/mL). Patients who became vitamin D–nondeficient had subtle but better DASH scores than patients who were still vitamin D–deficient or the control patients. Vitamin D levels at 6 months were found to have significant correlation with the DASH score at 6 months. Vitamin D levels at 6 months did not have significant correlation with motor conduction velocity or grip and pinch strengths. Conclusions: Women with CTS and vitamin D deficiency showed subtle but better DASH scores after surgery when vitamin D deficiency was corrected by supplementation. Type of study/level of evidence: Therapeutic IV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)649-654
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume44
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2019

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Wrist
Vitamin D
Vitamins
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Arm
Hand
Pinch Strength
Hand Strength
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Carpal tunnel release
  • carpal tunnel syndrome
  • outcome
  • vitamin D deficiency

Cite this

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title = "The Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency Correction on the Outcomes in Women After Carpal Tunnel Release",
abstract = "Purpose: Studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation improves myelination and recovery after nerve injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether correction of vitamin D level leads to better surgical outcomes in women with both carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and vitamin D deficiency. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 84 vitamin D–deficient women with CTS who underwent carpal tunnel release and then received daily vitamin D supplementation of 1,000 IU vitamin D for 6 months. We also reviewed 35 control patients who were vitamin D–nondeficient at baseline and thus did not receive the supplementation. At baseline and 6 months after surgery, we measured serum vitamin D levels, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, motor conduction velocity, and grip and pinch strengths. We compared the outcomes of CTS related to vitamin D levels. We also correlated baseline and follow-up vitamin D levels with the assessed parameters. Results: At 6 months, 59 patients became vitamin D–nondeficient (≥ 20 ng/mL) and 25 were still vitamin D–deficient (< 20 ng/mL). Patients who became vitamin D–nondeficient had subtle but better DASH scores than patients who were still vitamin D–deficient or the control patients. Vitamin D levels at 6 months were found to have significant correlation with the DASH score at 6 months. Vitamin D levels at 6 months did not have significant correlation with motor conduction velocity or grip and pinch strengths. Conclusions: Women with CTS and vitamin D deficiency showed subtle but better DASH scores after surgery when vitamin D deficiency was corrected by supplementation. Type of study/level of evidence: Therapeutic IV.",
keywords = "Carpal tunnel release, carpal tunnel syndrome, outcome, vitamin D deficiency",
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The Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency Correction on the Outcomes in Women After Carpal Tunnel Release. / Lee, Myung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Kwan Jae; Kim, Ji Hyeung; Baek, Goo Hyun.

In: Journal of Hand Surgery, Vol. 44, No. 8, 01.08.2019, p. 649-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - The Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency Correction on the Outcomes in Women After Carpal Tunnel Release

AU - Lee, Myung Ho

AU - Gong, Hyun Sik

AU - Lee, Min Ho

AU - Cho, Kwan Jae

AU - Kim, Ji Hyeung

AU - Baek, Goo Hyun

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Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - Purpose: Studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation improves myelination and recovery after nerve injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether correction of vitamin D level leads to better surgical outcomes in women with both carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and vitamin D deficiency. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 84 vitamin D–deficient women with CTS who underwent carpal tunnel release and then received daily vitamin D supplementation of 1,000 IU vitamin D for 6 months. We also reviewed 35 control patients who were vitamin D–nondeficient at baseline and thus did not receive the supplementation. At baseline and 6 months after surgery, we measured serum vitamin D levels, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, motor conduction velocity, and grip and pinch strengths. We compared the outcomes of CTS related to vitamin D levels. We also correlated baseline and follow-up vitamin D levels with the assessed parameters. Results: At 6 months, 59 patients became vitamin D–nondeficient (≥ 20 ng/mL) and 25 were still vitamin D–deficient (< 20 ng/mL). Patients who became vitamin D–nondeficient had subtle but better DASH scores than patients who were still vitamin D–deficient or the control patients. Vitamin D levels at 6 months were found to have significant correlation with the DASH score at 6 months. Vitamin D levels at 6 months did not have significant correlation with motor conduction velocity or grip and pinch strengths. Conclusions: Women with CTS and vitamin D deficiency showed subtle but better DASH scores after surgery when vitamin D deficiency was corrected by supplementation. Type of study/level of evidence: Therapeutic IV.

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KW - Carpal tunnel release

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