The Effect of Perioperative Intravenous Iron on Hemoglobin in Surgical Patients: A Meta-Analysis

Chang Hoon Koo, Hyun Jung Shin, Hyun Hee Cho, Jung Hee Ryu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Patient blood management aims to maintain hemoglobin level, minimize blood loss, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Ferric carboxymaltose, an intravenous iron agent, was included as a part of surgical patient blood management strategy. However, it is still controversial that ferric carboxymaltose can reduce transfusion requirements. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the benefits of perioperative ferric carboxymaltose on the postoperative hematological parameters and transfusion requirements. Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of ferric carboxymaltose were searched through databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and KoreaMed. Meta-analysis was performed using random effect models. Results: A total of 8 studies (n = 471) were included in the final analysis. Postoperative hemoglobin was higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group than in the control group (mean difference [MD], 0.58 g/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.80; P < 0.00001). Postoperative serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were also higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group (MD, 373.85 μg/L; 95% CI, 298.13 to 449.56; P < 0.00001; MD, 10.35%; 95% CI, 4.59 to 16.10; P < 0.00001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in the number of transfused patients, length of hospital stay, and adverse events between groups. Subgroup analysis revealed that adverse events were lower in the ferric carboxymaltose group than the oral iron group. Conclusions: This study supports that ferric carboxymaltose may increase the postoperative hemoglobin level in surgical patients. However, transfusion requirements could not be reduced by ferric carboxymaltose. Optimal dose and time should be further analyzed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-51
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume246
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2020

Fingerprint

Meta-Analysis
Hemoglobins
Iron
Confidence Intervals
Length of Stay
ferric carboxymaltose
Transferrin
Ferritins
MEDLINE
Blood Transfusion
Randomized Controlled Trials
Databases
Control Groups
Serum

Keywords

  • Blood transfusion
  • Ferric carboxymaltose
  • Perioperative care
  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{d8d41693e1954e6b800e9cef559a818c,
title = "The Effect of Perioperative Intravenous Iron on Hemoglobin in Surgical Patients: A Meta-Analysis",
abstract = "Background: Patient blood management aims to maintain hemoglobin level, minimize blood loss, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Ferric carboxymaltose, an intravenous iron agent, was included as a part of surgical patient blood management strategy. However, it is still controversial that ferric carboxymaltose can reduce transfusion requirements. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the benefits of perioperative ferric carboxymaltose on the postoperative hematological parameters and transfusion requirements. Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of ferric carboxymaltose were searched through databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and KoreaMed. Meta-analysis was performed using random effect models. Results: A total of 8 studies (n = 471) were included in the final analysis. Postoperative hemoglobin was higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group than in the control group (mean difference [MD], 0.58 g/dL; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.80; P < 0.00001). Postoperative serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were also higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group (MD, 373.85 μg/L; 95{\%} CI, 298.13 to 449.56; P < 0.00001; MD, 10.35{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 4.59 to 16.10; P < 0.00001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in the number of transfused patients, length of hospital stay, and adverse events between groups. Subgroup analysis revealed that adverse events were lower in the ferric carboxymaltose group than the oral iron group. Conclusions: This study supports that ferric carboxymaltose may increase the postoperative hemoglobin level in surgical patients. However, transfusion requirements could not be reduced by ferric carboxymaltose. Optimal dose and time should be further analyzed.",
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author = "Koo, {Chang Hoon} and Shin, {Hyun Jung} and Cho, {Hyun Hee} and Ryu, {Jung Hee}",
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The Effect of Perioperative Intravenous Iron on Hemoglobin in Surgical Patients : A Meta-Analysis. / Koo, Chang Hoon; Shin, Hyun Jung; Cho, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Jung Hee.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 246, 01.02.2020, p. 42-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Perioperative Intravenous Iron on Hemoglobin in Surgical Patients

T2 - A Meta-Analysis

AU - Koo, Chang Hoon

AU - Shin, Hyun Jung

AU - Cho, Hyun Hee

AU - Ryu, Jung Hee

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - Background: Patient blood management aims to maintain hemoglobin level, minimize blood loss, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Ferric carboxymaltose, an intravenous iron agent, was included as a part of surgical patient blood management strategy. However, it is still controversial that ferric carboxymaltose can reduce transfusion requirements. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the benefits of perioperative ferric carboxymaltose on the postoperative hematological parameters and transfusion requirements. Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of ferric carboxymaltose were searched through databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and KoreaMed. Meta-analysis was performed using random effect models. Results: A total of 8 studies (n = 471) were included in the final analysis. Postoperative hemoglobin was higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group than in the control group (mean difference [MD], 0.58 g/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.80; P < 0.00001). Postoperative serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were also higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group (MD, 373.85 μg/L; 95% CI, 298.13 to 449.56; P < 0.00001; MD, 10.35%; 95% CI, 4.59 to 16.10; P < 0.00001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in the number of transfused patients, length of hospital stay, and adverse events between groups. Subgroup analysis revealed that adverse events were lower in the ferric carboxymaltose group than the oral iron group. Conclusions: This study supports that ferric carboxymaltose may increase the postoperative hemoglobin level in surgical patients. However, transfusion requirements could not be reduced by ferric carboxymaltose. Optimal dose and time should be further analyzed.

AB - Background: Patient blood management aims to maintain hemoglobin level, minimize blood loss, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Ferric carboxymaltose, an intravenous iron agent, was included as a part of surgical patient blood management strategy. However, it is still controversial that ferric carboxymaltose can reduce transfusion requirements. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the benefits of perioperative ferric carboxymaltose on the postoperative hematological parameters and transfusion requirements. Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of ferric carboxymaltose were searched through databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and KoreaMed. Meta-analysis was performed using random effect models. Results: A total of 8 studies (n = 471) were included in the final analysis. Postoperative hemoglobin was higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group than in the control group (mean difference [MD], 0.58 g/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.80; P < 0.00001). Postoperative serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were also higher in the ferric carboxymaltose group (MD, 373.85 μg/L; 95% CI, 298.13 to 449.56; P < 0.00001; MD, 10.35%; 95% CI, 4.59 to 16.10; P < 0.00001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in the number of transfused patients, length of hospital stay, and adverse events between groups. Subgroup analysis revealed that adverse events were lower in the ferric carboxymaltose group than the oral iron group. Conclusions: This study supports that ferric carboxymaltose may increase the postoperative hemoglobin level in surgical patients. However, transfusion requirements could not be reduced by ferric carboxymaltose. Optimal dose and time should be further analyzed.

KW - Blood transfusion

KW - Ferric carboxymaltose

KW - Perioperative care

KW - Surgery

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