The effect of perceived social support on chemotherapy-related symptoms in patients with breast cancer: A prospective observational study

Gyu Han Oh, Chan Woo Yeom, Eun Jung Shim, Dooyoung Jung, Kwang Min Lee, Kyung Lak Son, Won Hyoung Kim, Jung Yoon Moon, Sanghyup Jung, Tae Yong Kim, Seock Ah Im, Kyung Hun Lee, Bong Jin Hahm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Few studies have examined the effect of perceived social support (PSS) on chemotherapy-related symptoms (CRS). This study examined the effect of PSS on CRS in 184 patients with breast cancer. Methods: Participants were consecutively enrolled from a tertiary general hospital in Seoul, South Korea. CRS were assessed eight times, from before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy to six months after the end of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. PSS was evaluated once, before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy session, using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Two groups were formed based on MSPSS scores: the low PSS group (n = 62) and the moderate-to-high PSS group (n = 122). Linear mixed model analyses were used to compare the change in CRS severity between the two groups during chemotherapy. Results: Results indicated a significant group-by-time (low PSS or moderate-to-high PSS; 8 periods of chemotherapy) interaction for pain (p =.005), nausea (p =.033), insomnia (p <.001), distress (p =.003), dyspnea (p =.014), memory loss (p =.021), vomiting (p =.016), and numbness (p =.008) in which the moderate-to-high PSS group showed significantly lower levels of increase in those symptoms during chemotherapy. Moreover, the effect of PSS on CRS differed depending on the sources of PSS. Conclusion: Patients with moderate-to-high PSS experience less severe CRS compared with patients with low PSS during chemotherapy. The current findings indicate the potential benefits of providing social support in the management of CRS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number109911
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume130
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

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Social Support
Observational Studies
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Self-Help Groups
Republic of Korea
Hypesthesia
Memory Disorders
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Tertiary Care Centers
General Hospitals
Dyspnea
Nausea
Vomiting
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy side effect
  • Chemotherapy-related symptoms
  • Perceived social support
  • Social support

Cite this

Oh, Gyu Han ; Yeom, Chan Woo ; Shim, Eun Jung ; Jung, Dooyoung ; Lee, Kwang Min ; Son, Kyung Lak ; Kim, Won Hyoung ; Moon, Jung Yoon ; Jung, Sanghyup ; Kim, Tae Yong ; Im, Seock Ah ; Lee, Kyung Hun ; Hahm, Bong Jin. / The effect of perceived social support on chemotherapy-related symptoms in patients with breast cancer : A prospective observational study. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2020 ; Vol. 130.
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title = "The effect of perceived social support on chemotherapy-related symptoms in patients with breast cancer: A prospective observational study",
abstract = "Objective: Few studies have examined the effect of perceived social support (PSS) on chemotherapy-related symptoms (CRS). This study examined the effect of PSS on CRS in 184 patients with breast cancer. Methods: Participants were consecutively enrolled from a tertiary general hospital in Seoul, South Korea. CRS were assessed eight times, from before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy to six months after the end of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. PSS was evaluated once, before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy session, using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Two groups were formed based on MSPSS scores: the low PSS group (n = 62) and the moderate-to-high PSS group (n = 122). Linear mixed model analyses were used to compare the change in CRS severity between the two groups during chemotherapy. Results: Results indicated a significant group-by-time (low PSS or moderate-to-high PSS; 8 periods of chemotherapy) interaction for pain (p =.005), nausea (p =.033), insomnia (p <.001), distress (p =.003), dyspnea (p =.014), memory loss (p =.021), vomiting (p =.016), and numbness (p =.008) in which the moderate-to-high PSS group showed significantly lower levels of increase in those symptoms during chemotherapy. Moreover, the effect of PSS on CRS differed depending on the sources of PSS. Conclusion: Patients with moderate-to-high PSS experience less severe CRS compared with patients with low PSS during chemotherapy. The current findings indicate the potential benefits of providing social support in the management of CRS.",
keywords = "Cancer, Chemotherapy side effect, Chemotherapy-related symptoms, Perceived social support, Social support",
author = "Oh, {Gyu Han} and Yeom, {Chan Woo} and Shim, {Eun Jung} and Dooyoung Jung and Lee, {Kwang Min} and Son, {Kyung Lak} and Kim, {Won Hyoung} and Moon, {Jung Yoon} and Sanghyup Jung and Kim, {Tae Yong} and Im, {Seock Ah} and Lee, {Kyung Hun} and Hahm, {Bong Jin}",
year = "2020",
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The effect of perceived social support on chemotherapy-related symptoms in patients with breast cancer : A prospective observational study. / Oh, Gyu Han; Yeom, Chan Woo; Shim, Eun Jung; Jung, Dooyoung; Lee, Kwang Min; Son, Kyung Lak; Kim, Won Hyoung; Moon, Jung Yoon; Jung, Sanghyup; Kim, Tae Yong; Im, Seock Ah; Lee, Kyung Hun; Hahm, Bong Jin.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 130, 109911, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of perceived social support on chemotherapy-related symptoms in patients with breast cancer

T2 - A prospective observational study

AU - Oh, Gyu Han

AU - Yeom, Chan Woo

AU - Shim, Eun Jung

AU - Jung, Dooyoung

AU - Lee, Kwang Min

AU - Son, Kyung Lak

AU - Kim, Won Hyoung

AU - Moon, Jung Yoon

AU - Jung, Sanghyup

AU - Kim, Tae Yong

AU - Im, Seock Ah

AU - Lee, Kyung Hun

AU - Hahm, Bong Jin

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Objective: Few studies have examined the effect of perceived social support (PSS) on chemotherapy-related symptoms (CRS). This study examined the effect of PSS on CRS in 184 patients with breast cancer. Methods: Participants were consecutively enrolled from a tertiary general hospital in Seoul, South Korea. CRS were assessed eight times, from before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy to six months after the end of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. PSS was evaluated once, before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy session, using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Two groups were formed based on MSPSS scores: the low PSS group (n = 62) and the moderate-to-high PSS group (n = 122). Linear mixed model analyses were used to compare the change in CRS severity between the two groups during chemotherapy. Results: Results indicated a significant group-by-time (low PSS or moderate-to-high PSS; 8 periods of chemotherapy) interaction for pain (p =.005), nausea (p =.033), insomnia (p <.001), distress (p =.003), dyspnea (p =.014), memory loss (p =.021), vomiting (p =.016), and numbness (p =.008) in which the moderate-to-high PSS group showed significantly lower levels of increase in those symptoms during chemotherapy. Moreover, the effect of PSS on CRS differed depending on the sources of PSS. Conclusion: Patients with moderate-to-high PSS experience less severe CRS compared with patients with low PSS during chemotherapy. The current findings indicate the potential benefits of providing social support in the management of CRS.

AB - Objective: Few studies have examined the effect of perceived social support (PSS) on chemotherapy-related symptoms (CRS). This study examined the effect of PSS on CRS in 184 patients with breast cancer. Methods: Participants were consecutively enrolled from a tertiary general hospital in Seoul, South Korea. CRS were assessed eight times, from before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy to six months after the end of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. PSS was evaluated once, before the first neoadjuvant chemotherapy session, using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Two groups were formed based on MSPSS scores: the low PSS group (n = 62) and the moderate-to-high PSS group (n = 122). Linear mixed model analyses were used to compare the change in CRS severity between the two groups during chemotherapy. Results: Results indicated a significant group-by-time (low PSS or moderate-to-high PSS; 8 periods of chemotherapy) interaction for pain (p =.005), nausea (p =.033), insomnia (p <.001), distress (p =.003), dyspnea (p =.014), memory loss (p =.021), vomiting (p =.016), and numbness (p =.008) in which the moderate-to-high PSS group showed significantly lower levels of increase in those symptoms during chemotherapy. Moreover, the effect of PSS on CRS differed depending on the sources of PSS. Conclusion: Patients with moderate-to-high PSS experience less severe CRS compared with patients with low PSS during chemotherapy. The current findings indicate the potential benefits of providing social support in the management of CRS.

KW - Cancer

KW - Chemotherapy side effect

KW - Chemotherapy-related symptoms

KW - Perceived social support

KW - Social support

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DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109911

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