The ed-plann score: A simple risk stratification tool for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests derived from emergency departments in Korea

Hyouk Jae Lim, Young Sun Ro, Ki Hong Kim, Jeong Ho Park, Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Early risk stratification of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with insufficient information in emergency departments (ED) is difficult but critical in improving intensive care resource allocation. This study aimed to develop a simple risk stratification score using initial information in the ED. Adult patients who had OHCA with medical etiology from 2016 to 2020 were enrolled from the Korean Cardiac Arrest Research Consortium (KoCARC) database. To develop a scoring system, a backward logistic regression analysis was conducted. The developed scoring system was validated in both external dataset and internal bootstrap resampling. A total of 8240 patients were analyzed, including 4712 in the development cohort and 3528 in the external validation cohort. An ED-PLANN score (range 0–5) was developed incorporating 1 point for each: P for serum pH ≤ 7.1, L for serum lactate ≥ 10 mmol/L, A for age ≥ 70 years old, N for non-shockable rhythm, and N for no-prehospital return of spontaneous circulation. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) for favorable neurological outcome was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.92–0.94) in the development cohort, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.92–0.95) in the validation cohort. Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness-of-fit tests also indicated good agreement. The ED-PLANN score is a practical and easily applicable clinical scoring system for predicting favorable neurological outcomes of OHCA patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number174
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Big data
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Prediction model
  • Prognosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The ed-plann score: A simple risk stratification tool for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests derived from emergency departments in Korea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this