Target-oriented motor imagery for grasping action: different characteristics of brain activation between kinesthetic and visual imagery

Woo Hyung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Han Gil Seo, Byung Mo Oh, Hyung Seok Nam, Yoon Jae Kim, Hyun Haeng Lee, Min Gu Kang, Sungwan Kim, Moon Suk Bang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Motor imagery (MI) for target-oriented movements, which is a basis for functional activities of daily living, can be more appropriate than non-target-oriented MI as tasks to promote motor recovery or brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. This study aimed to explore different characteristics of brain activation among target-oriented kinesthetic imagery (KI) and visual imagery (VI) in the first-person (VI-1) and third-person (VI-3) perspectives. Eighteen healthy volunteers were evaluated for MI ability, trained for the three types of target-oriented MIs, and scanned using 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under MI and perceptual control conditions, presented in a block design. Post-experimental questionnaires were administered after fMRI. Common brain regions activated during the three types of MI were the left premotor area and inferior parietal lobule, irrespective of the MI modalities or perspectives. Contrast analyses showed significantly increased brain activation only in the contrast of KI versus VI-1 and KI versus VI-3 for considerably extensive brain regions, including the supplementary motor area and insula. Neural activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum during VI-1 and KI was significantly correlated with MI ability measured by mental chronometry and a self-reported questionnaire, respectively. These results can provide a basis in developing MI-based protocols for neurorehabilitation to improve motor recovery and BCI training in severely paralyzed individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12770
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Brain
Brain-Computer Interfaces
Aptitude
Motor Cortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parietal Lobe
Activities of Daily Living

Cite this

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title = "Target-oriented motor imagery for grasping action: different characteristics of brain activation between kinesthetic and visual imagery",
abstract = "Motor imagery (MI) for target-oriented movements, which is a basis for functional activities of daily living, can be more appropriate than non-target-oriented MI as tasks to promote motor recovery or brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. This study aimed to explore different characteristics of brain activation among target-oriented kinesthetic imagery (KI) and visual imagery (VI) in the first-person (VI-1) and third-person (VI-3) perspectives. Eighteen healthy volunteers were evaluated for MI ability, trained for the three types of target-oriented MIs, and scanned using 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under MI and perceptual control conditions, presented in a block design. Post-experimental questionnaires were administered after fMRI. Common brain regions activated during the three types of MI were the left premotor area and inferior parietal lobule, irrespective of the MI modalities or perspectives. Contrast analyses showed significantly increased brain activation only in the contrast of KI versus VI-1 and KI versus VI-3 for considerably extensive brain regions, including the supplementary motor area and insula. Neural activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum during VI-1 and KI was significantly correlated with MI ability measured by mental chronometry and a self-reported questionnaire, respectively. These results can provide a basis in developing MI-based protocols for neurorehabilitation to improve motor recovery and BCI training in severely paralyzed individuals.",
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Target-oriented motor imagery for grasping action : different characteristics of brain activation between kinesthetic and visual imagery. / Lee, Woo Hyung; Kim, Eunkyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung Mo; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yoon Jae; Lee, Hyun Haeng; Kang, Min Gu; Kim, Sungwan; Bang, Moon Suk.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 12770, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Target-oriented motor imagery for grasping action

T2 - different characteristics of brain activation between kinesthetic and visual imagery

AU - Lee, Woo Hyung

AU - Kim, Eunkyung

AU - Seo, Han Gil

AU - Oh, Byung Mo

AU - Nam, Hyung Seok

AU - Kim, Yoon Jae

AU - Lee, Hyun Haeng

AU - Kang, Min Gu

AU - Kim, Sungwan

AU - Bang, Moon Suk

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

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