Subcontractors and increased risk for work-related diseases and absenteeism

Kyoung-Bok Min, Shin G. Park, Jae S. Song, Kwan H. Yi, Tae W. Jang, Jin Y. Min

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite increasing reliance on subcontracting in many economic sectors, there is little information available on occupational health and safety issues among subcontractor employees. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of subcontracting on self-reported health problems and absences due to occupational accidents and sickness using a nationally representative sample from South Korea. Methods: The data used were sampled from the second wave of the Korean Working Conditions Survey [2010]. Information on 3,282 parent firm employees and 728 subcontractor employees was obtained. For the logistic regression model, the outcomes were work-related health problems and absenteeism. The independent variables were personal and occupational characteristics, job aspects, and working hazards. Results: Subcontractor employees were significantly more likely to experience health problems than the employee at parent firms. In particular, subcontractors' risk of injuries and anxiety/depression increased twofold (odd ratios, OR=2.01, 95% confidence interval, CIs, 1.24-3.26) and threefold (OR=2.95, 95% CIs 1.52-5.73), respectively, after controlling for potential variables. In addition, subcontractor employees were three times more likely than employees at parent firms to miss work due to illness (OR=3.56; 95% CIs 2.02-6.26). Working conditions, especially those related to job aspects and workplace exposures, attenuated these risks. Conclusion: Subcontracting workers were found to have a higher risk of work-related diseases and a higher absenteeism rate than parent firm workers. Our study highlights the need to protect and improve the occupational health and safety of subcontractor employees. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:1296-1306, 2013.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1296-1306
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume56
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Absenteeism
Occupational Health
Logistic Models
Occupational Accidents
Republic of Korea
Health
Workplace
Anxiety
Odds Ratio
Economics
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Occupational disease
  • Occupational injury
  • Subcontracting
  • Working condition

Cite this

Min, Kyoung-Bok ; Park, Shin G. ; Song, Jae S. ; Yi, Kwan H. ; Jang, Tae W. ; Min, Jin Y. / Subcontractors and increased risk for work-related diseases and absenteeism. In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 56, No. 11. pp. 1296-1306.
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abstract = "Background: Despite increasing reliance on subcontracting in many economic sectors, there is little information available on occupational health and safety issues among subcontractor employees. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of subcontracting on self-reported health problems and absences due to occupational accidents and sickness using a nationally representative sample from South Korea. Methods: The data used were sampled from the second wave of the Korean Working Conditions Survey [2010]. Information on 3,282 parent firm employees and 728 subcontractor employees was obtained. For the logistic regression model, the outcomes were work-related health problems and absenteeism. The independent variables were personal and occupational characteristics, job aspects, and working hazards. Results: Subcontractor employees were significantly more likely to experience health problems than the employee at parent firms. In particular, subcontractors' risk of injuries and anxiety/depression increased twofold (odd ratios, OR=2.01, 95{\%} confidence interval, CIs, 1.24-3.26) and threefold (OR=2.95, 95{\%} CIs 1.52-5.73), respectively, after controlling for potential variables. In addition, subcontractor employees were three times more likely than employees at parent firms to miss work due to illness (OR=3.56; 95{\%} CIs 2.02-6.26). Working conditions, especially those related to job aspects and workplace exposures, attenuated these risks. Conclusion: Subcontracting workers were found to have a higher risk of work-related diseases and a higher absenteeism rate than parent firm workers. Our study highlights the need to protect and improve the occupational health and safety of subcontractor employees. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:1296-1306, 2013.",
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Subcontractors and increased risk for work-related diseases and absenteeism. / Min, Kyoung-Bok; Park, Shin G.; Song, Jae S.; Yi, Kwan H.; Jang, Tae W.; Min, Jin Y.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 56, No. 11, 01.11.2013, p. 1296-1306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Subcontractors and increased risk for work-related diseases and absenteeism

AU - Min, Kyoung-Bok

AU - Park, Shin G.

AU - Song, Jae S.

AU - Yi, Kwan H.

AU - Jang, Tae W.

AU - Min, Jin Y.

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N2 - Background: Despite increasing reliance on subcontracting in many economic sectors, there is little information available on occupational health and safety issues among subcontractor employees. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of subcontracting on self-reported health problems and absences due to occupational accidents and sickness using a nationally representative sample from South Korea. Methods: The data used were sampled from the second wave of the Korean Working Conditions Survey [2010]. Information on 3,282 parent firm employees and 728 subcontractor employees was obtained. For the logistic regression model, the outcomes were work-related health problems and absenteeism. The independent variables were personal and occupational characteristics, job aspects, and working hazards. Results: Subcontractor employees were significantly more likely to experience health problems than the employee at parent firms. In particular, subcontractors' risk of injuries and anxiety/depression increased twofold (odd ratios, OR=2.01, 95% confidence interval, CIs, 1.24-3.26) and threefold (OR=2.95, 95% CIs 1.52-5.73), respectively, after controlling for potential variables. In addition, subcontractor employees were three times more likely than employees at parent firms to miss work due to illness (OR=3.56; 95% CIs 2.02-6.26). Working conditions, especially those related to job aspects and workplace exposures, attenuated these risks. Conclusion: Subcontracting workers were found to have a higher risk of work-related diseases and a higher absenteeism rate than parent firm workers. Our study highlights the need to protect and improve the occupational health and safety of subcontractor employees. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:1296-1306, 2013.

AB - Background: Despite increasing reliance on subcontracting in many economic sectors, there is little information available on occupational health and safety issues among subcontractor employees. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of subcontracting on self-reported health problems and absences due to occupational accidents and sickness using a nationally representative sample from South Korea. Methods: The data used were sampled from the second wave of the Korean Working Conditions Survey [2010]. Information on 3,282 parent firm employees and 728 subcontractor employees was obtained. For the logistic regression model, the outcomes were work-related health problems and absenteeism. The independent variables were personal and occupational characteristics, job aspects, and working hazards. Results: Subcontractor employees were significantly more likely to experience health problems than the employee at parent firms. In particular, subcontractors' risk of injuries and anxiety/depression increased twofold (odd ratios, OR=2.01, 95% confidence interval, CIs, 1.24-3.26) and threefold (OR=2.95, 95% CIs 1.52-5.73), respectively, after controlling for potential variables. In addition, subcontractor employees were three times more likely than employees at parent firms to miss work due to illness (OR=3.56; 95% CIs 2.02-6.26). Working conditions, especially those related to job aspects and workplace exposures, attenuated these risks. Conclusion: Subcontracting workers were found to have a higher risk of work-related diseases and a higher absenteeism rate than parent firm workers. Our study highlights the need to protect and improve the occupational health and safety of subcontractor employees. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:1296-1306, 2013.

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