Social Engagement, Health, and Changes in Occupational Status

Analysis of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA)

Jin young Min, Kyung jong Lee, Jae beom Park, Sung il Cho, Shin goo Park, Kyoung-Bok Min

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We focused on whether changes in the occupational status of older male adults can be influenced by social engagement and health status measured at the baseline. Methods: This study used a sample of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), and the study population was restricted to 1.531 men who were aged 55 to 80 years at the 2006 baseline survey and participated in the second survey in 2008. Social engagement and health status, measured by the number of chronic diseases, grip strength, and depressive symptoms as well as covariates (age, marital status, educational level, and household income) were based on data from the 2006 baseline survey. Occupational engagement over the first and second survey was divided into four categories: 'consistently employed' (n = 892), 'employed-unemployed' (n = 152), 'unemployed-employed' (n = 138), and 'consistently unemployed' (n = 349). Results: In the multinomial model, the 'consistently employed' and 'unemployed-employed' groups had significantly higher social engagement (1.19 and 1.32 times, respectively) than the referent. The number of chronic diseases was significantly associated with four occupational changes, and the 'unemployed-employed' had the fewest chronic conditions. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that social engagement and health status are likely to affect opportunities to continue working or to start working for older male adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere46500
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Oct 2012

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longitudinal studies
Longitudinal Studies
Aging of materials
health status
Health
Health Status
chronic diseases
Chronic Disease
marital status
household income
Marital Status
educational status
Hand Strength
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Depression
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population
sampling
methodology

Cite this

Min, Jin young ; Lee, Kyung jong ; Park, Jae beom ; Cho, Sung il ; Park, Shin goo ; Min, Kyoung-Bok. / Social Engagement, Health, and Changes in Occupational Status : Analysis of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA). In: PLoS ONE. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 10.
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abstract = "Background: We focused on whether changes in the occupational status of older male adults can be influenced by social engagement and health status measured at the baseline. Methods: This study used a sample of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), and the study population was restricted to 1.531 men who were aged 55 to 80 years at the 2006 baseline survey and participated in the second survey in 2008. Social engagement and health status, measured by the number of chronic diseases, grip strength, and depressive symptoms as well as covariates (age, marital status, educational level, and household income) were based on data from the 2006 baseline survey. Occupational engagement over the first and second survey was divided into four categories: 'consistently employed' (n = 892), 'employed-unemployed' (n = 152), 'unemployed-employed' (n = 138), and 'consistently unemployed' (n = 349). Results: In the multinomial model, the 'consistently employed' and 'unemployed-employed' groups had significantly higher social engagement (1.19 and 1.32 times, respectively) than the referent. The number of chronic diseases was significantly associated with four occupational changes, and the 'unemployed-employed' had the fewest chronic conditions. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that social engagement and health status are likely to affect opportunities to continue working or to start working for older male adults.",
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Social Engagement, Health, and Changes in Occupational Status : Analysis of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA). / Min, Jin young; Lee, Kyung jong; Park, Jae beom; Cho, Sung il; Park, Shin goo; Min, Kyoung-Bok.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 10, e46500, 02.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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