Severity of post-stroke aphasia according to aphasia type and lesion location in Koreans

Eun Kyoung Kang, Hae Min Sohn, Moon Ku Han, Won Kim, Tai Ryoon Han, Nam Jong Paik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the relations between post-stroke aphasia severity and aphasia type and lesion location, a retrospective review was undertaken using the medical records of 97 Korean patients, treated within 90 days of onset, for aphasia caused by unilateral left hemispheric stroke. Types of aphasia were classified according to the validated Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery (K-WAB), and severities of aphasia were quantified using WAB Aphasia Quotients (AQ). Lesion locations were classified as cortical or subcortical, and were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using AQ values to classify aphasia severity by aphasia type and lesion location. Cluster analysis resulted in four severity clusters: 1) mild; anomic type, 2) moderate; Wernicke's, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, conduction, and mixed transcortical types, 3) moderately severe; Broca's aphasia, and 4) severe; global aphasia, and also in three lesion location clusters: 1) mild; subcortical 2) moderate; cortical lesions involving Broca's and/or Wernicke's areas, and 3) severe; insular and cortical lesions not in Broca's or Wernicke's areas. These results revealed that within 3 months of stroke, global aphasia was the more severely affected type and cortical lesions were more likely to affect language function than subcortical lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-127
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Korean Medical Science
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2010

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Aphasia
Stroke
Cluster Analysis
Broca Aphasia
Medical Records
Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Classification
  • Stroke

Cite this

Kang, Eun Kyoung ; Sohn, Hae Min ; Han, Moon Ku ; Kim, Won ; Han, Tai Ryoon ; Paik, Nam Jong. / Severity of post-stroke aphasia according to aphasia type and lesion location in Koreans. In: Journal of Korean Medical Science. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 123-127.
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Severity of post-stroke aphasia according to aphasia type and lesion location in Koreans. / Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min; Han, Moon Ku; Kim, Won; Han, Tai Ryoon; Paik, Nam Jong.

In: Journal of Korean Medical Science, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 123-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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