Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults

Jin Young Min, Kyoung-Bok Min

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence shows that antioxidant-rich food reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting oxidative stress. This study investigates whether serum levels of carotenoids were associated with the risk of AD mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults. Methods: We used data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File. A total of 6,958 participants aged older than 50 years were included in this study. Results: We found that high serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin at baseline were associated with a lower risk of AD mortality after adjustment for potential covariates. The reduction in the mortality risk was progressively raised by increasing serum lycopene (HR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.69) and lutein+zeaxanthin (HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.85) levels. In contrast, no associations with AD mortality were observed for other serum carotenoids, including alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin. Conclusion: High serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of AD mortality in adults. Our findings suggest that a high intake of lycopene-or lutein+zeaxanthin-rich food may be important for reducing the AD mortality risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-256
Number of pages11
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume37
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Lutein
Alzheimer Disease
Mortality
Serum
Nutrition Surveys
Carotenoids
Oxidative Stress
Food
beta Carotene
Zeaxanthins
lycopene
Health Surveys
Antioxidants
Databases

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Carotenoid
  • Oxidative stress
  • Prevention

Cite this

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title = "Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults",
abstract = "Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence shows that antioxidant-rich food reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting oxidative stress. This study investigates whether serum levels of carotenoids were associated with the risk of AD mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults. Methods: We used data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File. A total of 6,958 participants aged older than 50 years were included in this study. Results: We found that high serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin at baseline were associated with a lower risk of AD mortality after adjustment for potential covariates. The reduction in the mortality risk was progressively raised by increasing serum lycopene (HR = 0.26, 95{\%} CI 0.10-0.69) and lutein+zeaxanthin (HR = 0.43, 95{\%} CI 0.22-0.85) levels. In contrast, no associations with AD mortality were observed for other serum carotenoids, including alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin. Conclusion: High serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of AD mortality in adults. Our findings suggest that a high intake of lycopene-or lutein+zeaxanthin-rich food may be important for reducing the AD mortality risk.",
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Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults. / Min, Jin Young; Min, Kyoung-Bok.

In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, Vol. 37, No. 3-4, 01.01.2014, p. 246-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence shows that antioxidant-rich food reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting oxidative stress. This study investigates whether serum levels of carotenoids were associated with the risk of AD mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults. Methods: We used data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File. A total of 6,958 participants aged older than 50 years were included in this study. Results: We found that high serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin at baseline were associated with a lower risk of AD mortality after adjustment for potential covariates. The reduction in the mortality risk was progressively raised by increasing serum lycopene (HR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.69) and lutein+zeaxanthin (HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.85) levels. In contrast, no associations with AD mortality were observed for other serum carotenoids, including alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin. Conclusion: High serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of AD mortality in adults. Our findings suggest that a high intake of lycopene-or lutein+zeaxanthin-rich food may be important for reducing the AD mortality risk.

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