Risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or emergency room visit according to delivery device for inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting beta-agonist in patients with chronic airway diseases as real-world evidence

Ju Hee Park, Yunjung Kim, Seongmi Choi, Eun Jin Jang, Jimin Kim, Chang Hoon Lee, Jae Joon Yim, Ho il Yoon, Deog Kyeom Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A fixed-dose combination of inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta agonist (ICS/LABA) may increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic airway diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Although lung deposition of ICS/LABA is dependent on the inhaler device and inhalation technique, there have been few studies comparing the risk for pneumonia according to the type of device used to deliver ICS/LABA in real-world practice. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Database of the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service. New users who began ICS/LABA were selected and followed-up 180 days after ICS/LABA initiation. The risk for pneumonia requiring emergency room (ER) visit or admission was compared according to inhaler device used—pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI)—after individual exact matching (1:5). Among the eligible cohort of 245,477 new ICS/LABA users, 7,942 patients who used pMDI only were matched with 39,690 patients who used DPI only. The incidence of pneumonia was higher in the pMDI group (1.6%) than the DPI group (1.1%); the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for pneumonia was 1.6 (95% CI 1.3–2.0; p < 0.0001). In subgroup analyses, a significantly higher risk for pneumonia was found in the pMDI group compared with the DPI group regardless of the presence of history of pneumonia (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.2–2.3]; p = 0.002), COPD (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.0]; p = 0.0007), or asthma (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.2]; p = 0.0008). In analyses of real-world data, pMDI users incurred a higher risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or ER visit compared with DPI users.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12004
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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Dry Powder Inhalers
Hospital Emergency Service
Pneumonia
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hospitalization
Chronic Disease
Equipment and Supplies
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Asthma
Metered Dose Inhalers
National Health Programs
Health Insurance
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Lung
Incidence

Cite this

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title = "Risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or emergency room visit according to delivery device for inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting beta-agonist in patients with chronic airway diseases as real-world evidence",
abstract = "A fixed-dose combination of inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta agonist (ICS/LABA) may increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic airway diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Although lung deposition of ICS/LABA is dependent on the inhaler device and inhalation technique, there have been few studies comparing the risk for pneumonia according to the type of device used to deliver ICS/LABA in real-world practice. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Database of the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service. New users who began ICS/LABA were selected and followed-up 180 days after ICS/LABA initiation. The risk for pneumonia requiring emergency room (ER) visit or admission was compared according to inhaler device used—pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI)—after individual exact matching (1:5). Among the eligible cohort of 245,477 new ICS/LABA users, 7,942 patients who used pMDI only were matched with 39,690 patients who used DPI only. The incidence of pneumonia was higher in the pMDI group (1.6{\%}) than the DPI group (1.1{\%}); the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for pneumonia was 1.6 (95{\%} CI 1.3–2.0; p < 0.0001). In subgroup analyses, a significantly higher risk for pneumonia was found in the pMDI group compared with the DPI group regardless of the presence of history of pneumonia (HR 1.7 [95{\%} CI 1.2–2.3]; p = 0.002), COPD (HR 1.6 [95{\%} CI 1.2–2.0]; p = 0.0007), or asthma (HR 1.6 [95{\%} CI 1.2–2.2]; p = 0.0008). In analyses of real-world data, pMDI users incurred a higher risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or ER visit compared with DPI users.",
author = "Park, {Ju Hee} and Yunjung Kim and Seongmi Choi and Jang, {Eun Jin} and Jimin Kim and Lee, {Chang Hoon} and Yim, {Jae Joon} and Yoon, {Ho il} and Kim, {Deog Kyeom}",
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T1 - Risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or emergency room visit according to delivery device for inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting beta-agonist in patients with chronic airway diseases as real-world evidence

AU - Park, Ju Hee

AU - Kim, Yunjung

AU - Choi, Seongmi

AU - Jang, Eun Jin

AU - Kim, Jimin

AU - Lee, Chang Hoon

AU - Yim, Jae Joon

AU - Yoon, Ho il

AU - Kim, Deog Kyeom

PY - 2019/12/1

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N2 - A fixed-dose combination of inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta agonist (ICS/LABA) may increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic airway diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Although lung deposition of ICS/LABA is dependent on the inhaler device and inhalation technique, there have been few studies comparing the risk for pneumonia according to the type of device used to deliver ICS/LABA in real-world practice. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Database of the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service. New users who began ICS/LABA were selected and followed-up 180 days after ICS/LABA initiation. The risk for pneumonia requiring emergency room (ER) visit or admission was compared according to inhaler device used—pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI)—after individual exact matching (1:5). Among the eligible cohort of 245,477 new ICS/LABA users, 7,942 patients who used pMDI only were matched with 39,690 patients who used DPI only. The incidence of pneumonia was higher in the pMDI group (1.6%) than the DPI group (1.1%); the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for pneumonia was 1.6 (95% CI 1.3–2.0; p < 0.0001). In subgroup analyses, a significantly higher risk for pneumonia was found in the pMDI group compared with the DPI group regardless of the presence of history of pneumonia (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.2–2.3]; p = 0.002), COPD (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.0]; p = 0.0007), or asthma (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.2]; p = 0.0008). In analyses of real-world data, pMDI users incurred a higher risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or ER visit compared with DPI users.

AB - A fixed-dose combination of inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta agonist (ICS/LABA) may increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic airway diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Although lung deposition of ICS/LABA is dependent on the inhaler device and inhalation technique, there have been few studies comparing the risk for pneumonia according to the type of device used to deliver ICS/LABA in real-world practice. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Database of the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service. New users who began ICS/LABA were selected and followed-up 180 days after ICS/LABA initiation. The risk for pneumonia requiring emergency room (ER) visit or admission was compared according to inhaler device used—pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI)—after individual exact matching (1:5). Among the eligible cohort of 245,477 new ICS/LABA users, 7,942 patients who used pMDI only were matched with 39,690 patients who used DPI only. The incidence of pneumonia was higher in the pMDI group (1.6%) than the DPI group (1.1%); the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for pneumonia was 1.6 (95% CI 1.3–2.0; p < 0.0001). In subgroup analyses, a significantly higher risk for pneumonia was found in the pMDI group compared with the DPI group regardless of the presence of history of pneumonia (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.2–2.3]; p = 0.002), COPD (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.0]; p = 0.0007), or asthma (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2–2.2]; p = 0.0008). In analyses of real-world data, pMDI users incurred a higher risk for pneumonia requiring hospitalization or ER visit compared with DPI users.

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