Relationship of Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Asthma, Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, Anxiety, and Depression

Jong Yeup Kim, Inseok Ko, Myoung Suk Kim, Dae Woo Kim, Bum Joo Cho, Dong Kyu Kim

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Abstract

Background: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the nose and paranasal sinuses. It often has a high burden and is difficult to treat because of comorbidities. However, no population-based, long-term longitudinal study has investigated the relationship between CRS and its comorbidities. Objective: To investigate the potential relationship between CRS and its comorbidities—asthma, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, anxiety disorder, and depression—using a representative sample. Methods: Data for a total of 1,025,340 patients from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database from 2002 to 2013, including 14,762 patients with CRS and 29,524 patients without CRS, were used for this study. A 1:2 propensity score matching was performed using the nearest-neighbor matching method and sociodemographic factors and enrollment year. Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) of CRS for asthma, AMI, stroke, anxiety disorder, and depression. Results: The incidence rates of asthma, AMI, and stroke were 71.1, 3.1, and 7.7 per 1000 person-years in patients with CRS, respectively. The adjusted HRs of asthma, AMI, and stroke were 2.06 (95% CI, 2.00-2.13), 1.29 (95% CI, 1.15-1.44), and 1.16 (95% CI, 1.08-1.24), respectively, in patients with CRS versus patients without CRS. The incidence rates of anxiety disorder and depression in patients with CRS were 42.1 and 24.2 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The adjusted HRs of anxiety disorder (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.49-1.60) and depression (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.44-1.57) were significantly greater in patients with CRS versus patients without CRS. Conclusions: CRS is associated with an increased incidence of asthma, AMI, stroke, anxiety disorder, and depression. Therefore, we suggest that clinicians should monitor patients with CRS carefully, and optimize management as a means to potentially decrease these other associated comorbid conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)721-727.e3
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

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Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Anxiety
  • Asthma
  • Comorbidity
  • Depression
  • Rhinosinusitis
  • Stroke

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