Relationship between Obesity and Lumbar Spine Degeneration

A Cross-Sectional Study from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010-2012

Sang Yoon Lee, Won Kim, Shi-Uk Lee, Kyoung Hyo Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although several studies have shown that obesity affects low back pain (LBP), the relationship between degenerative lumbar spine (LSD) and obesity has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated whether obesity is independently associated with LSD in the general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study used public data from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). Subjects aged ≥50 years who had completed surveys were included (3668 men and 4966 women). Obesity was classified based on the body mass index, and LSD was assessed by lumbar spine radiographs. Independent associations of obesity with LSD or LBP were determined using odds ratios (OR) adjusted by two regression models. Results: The prevalence of obesity was more frequent in women than in men (38.27% vs. 33.97%, P < 0.001). Compared with normal weight women, the risk of LSD was increased in overweight and obese women following adjustments [OR = 1.227, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.019-1.477; OR = 1.217, 95% CI: 1.024-1.446, respectively]. When obesity was subdivided, the obese II group showed higher odds for LSD in women (OR = 1.797, 95% CI: 1.287-2.510). However, obesity was not correlated with LSD in men. There was no significant association between obesity and LBP in either men or women. Conclusions: Compared with normal weight women, LSD risk was higher in overweight and obese women, especially those in the obese II subgroup. These findings suggest that maintaining normal body weight may be a preventative factor of LSD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-66
Number of pages7
JournalMetabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2019

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Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Nutrition Surveys
Spine
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Low Back Pain
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures
Ideal Body Weight
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • cross-sectional studies
  • low back pain
  • spine
  • spondylosis

Cite this

@article{4ad57ee3408e4798904bfeca4265274e,
title = "Relationship between Obesity and Lumbar Spine Degeneration: A Cross-Sectional Study from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010-2012",
abstract = "Background: Although several studies have shown that obesity affects low back pain (LBP), the relationship between degenerative lumbar spine (LSD) and obesity has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated whether obesity is independently associated with LSD in the general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study used public data from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). Subjects aged ≥50 years who had completed surveys were included (3668 men and 4966 women). Obesity was classified based on the body mass index, and LSD was assessed by lumbar spine radiographs. Independent associations of obesity with LSD or LBP were determined using odds ratios (OR) adjusted by two regression models. Results: The prevalence of obesity was more frequent in women than in men (38.27{\%} vs. 33.97{\%}, P < 0.001). Compared with normal weight women, the risk of LSD was increased in overweight and obese women following adjustments [OR = 1.227, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.019-1.477; OR = 1.217, 95{\%} CI: 1.024-1.446, respectively]. When obesity was subdivided, the obese II group showed higher odds for LSD in women (OR = 1.797, 95{\%} CI: 1.287-2.510). However, obesity was not correlated with LSD in men. There was no significant association between obesity and LBP in either men or women. Conclusions: Compared with normal weight women, LSD risk was higher in overweight and obese women, especially those in the obese II subgroup. These findings suggest that maintaining normal body weight may be a preventative factor of LSD.",
keywords = "Obesity, cross-sectional studies, low back pain, spine, spondylosis",
author = "Lee, {Sang Yoon} and Won Kim and Shi-Uk Lee and Choi, {Kyoung Hyo}",
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Relationship between Obesity and Lumbar Spine Degeneration : A Cross-Sectional Study from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010-2012. / Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Won; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Kyoung Hyo.

In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 60-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between Obesity and Lumbar Spine Degeneration

T2 - A Cross-Sectional Study from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010-2012

AU - Lee, Sang Yoon

AU - Kim, Won

AU - Lee, Shi-Uk

AU - Choi, Kyoung Hyo

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Background: Although several studies have shown that obesity affects low back pain (LBP), the relationship between degenerative lumbar spine (LSD) and obesity has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated whether obesity is independently associated with LSD in the general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study used public data from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). Subjects aged ≥50 years who had completed surveys were included (3668 men and 4966 women). Obesity was classified based on the body mass index, and LSD was assessed by lumbar spine radiographs. Independent associations of obesity with LSD or LBP were determined using odds ratios (OR) adjusted by two regression models. Results: The prevalence of obesity was more frequent in women than in men (38.27% vs. 33.97%, P < 0.001). Compared with normal weight women, the risk of LSD was increased in overweight and obese women following adjustments [OR = 1.227, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.019-1.477; OR = 1.217, 95% CI: 1.024-1.446, respectively]. When obesity was subdivided, the obese II group showed higher odds for LSD in women (OR = 1.797, 95% CI: 1.287-2.510). However, obesity was not correlated with LSD in men. There was no significant association between obesity and LBP in either men or women. Conclusions: Compared with normal weight women, LSD risk was higher in overweight and obese women, especially those in the obese II subgroup. These findings suggest that maintaining normal body weight may be a preventative factor of LSD.

AB - Background: Although several studies have shown that obesity affects low back pain (LBP), the relationship between degenerative lumbar spine (LSD) and obesity has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated whether obesity is independently associated with LSD in the general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study used public data from the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). Subjects aged ≥50 years who had completed surveys were included (3668 men and 4966 women). Obesity was classified based on the body mass index, and LSD was assessed by lumbar spine radiographs. Independent associations of obesity with LSD or LBP were determined using odds ratios (OR) adjusted by two regression models. Results: The prevalence of obesity was more frequent in women than in men (38.27% vs. 33.97%, P < 0.001). Compared with normal weight women, the risk of LSD was increased in overweight and obese women following adjustments [OR = 1.227, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.019-1.477; OR = 1.217, 95% CI: 1.024-1.446, respectively]. When obesity was subdivided, the obese II group showed higher odds for LSD in women (OR = 1.797, 95% CI: 1.287-2.510). However, obesity was not correlated with LSD in men. There was no significant association between obesity and LBP in either men or women. Conclusions: Compared with normal weight women, LSD risk was higher in overweight and obese women, especially those in the obese II subgroup. These findings suggest that maintaining normal body weight may be a preventative factor of LSD.

KW - Obesity

KW - cross-sectional studies

KW - low back pain

KW - spine

KW - spondylosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060715299&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/met.2018.0051

DO - 10.1089/met.2018.0051

M3 - Review article

VL - 17

SP - 60

EP - 66

JO - Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

JF - Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

SN - 1540-4196

IS - 1

ER -