Relationship between education, leisure activities, and cognitive functions in older adults

Soowon Park, Boungho Choi, Chihyun Choi, Jae Myeong Kang, Jun-Young Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study aimed to reveal the relationship between life activities and cognitive function and to evaluate the interaction between education and various leisure activities in predicting cognitive function. Using a cross-sectional research design with retrospective data, a total of 210 healthy Korean older adults participated and reported their years of education, working, and lifelong leisure activities. Cognitive function was measured using the Mini Mental State Examination. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that education was positively associated with cognitive function, whereas working activity was not. Craft activities positively predicted cognitive function. Furthermore, education moderated the relationship between leisure activities and cognitive function. Only low-educated participants showed a decrease in cognitive function as they performed domestic chores and an increase in cognitive function as they participated in social activities and volunteering. High-educated participants showed no relation between leisure activities and cognitive function. The results of the current study suggest that the relationship between various leisure activities and cognitive function can vary based on the nature of the leisure activity and educational level. Professionals examining older adults’ cognitive function should pay closer attention to educational level, as well as life styles (i.e. leisure activities), to provide appropriate interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1651-1660
Number of pages10
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Dec 2019

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Leisure Activities
Cognition
Education
Life Style
Research Design
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • cognitive reserve
  • education
  • interaction
  • leisure activities

Cite this

Park, Soowon ; Choi, Boungho ; Choi, Chihyun ; Kang, Jae Myeong ; Lee, Jun-Young. / Relationship between education, leisure activities, and cognitive functions in older adults. In: Aging and Mental Health. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 12. pp. 1651-1660.
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Relationship between education, leisure activities, and cognitive functions in older adults. / Park, Soowon; Choi, Boungho; Choi, Chihyun; Kang, Jae Myeong; Lee, Jun-Young.

In: Aging and Mental Health, Vol. 23, No. 12, 02.12.2019, p. 1651-1660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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