Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016

Donghee Kim, Won Kim, Adeyinka C. Adejumo, George Cholankeril, Sean P. Tighe, Robert J. Wong, Stevan A. Gonzalez, Stephen A. Harrison, Zobair M. Younossi, Aijaz Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background and aim: Advanced fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported to have a higher risk of hepatic and non-hepatic mortality. We aim to study the recent trends in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in a large population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 28,739 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2016 were utilized. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and the US fatty liver index (USFLI) in the absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. The presence and absence of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD was determined by the NAFLD fibrosis score, FIB-4 score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index. Results: The prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis increased from 2.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.1] in 2005–2008 and 4.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 5.0% (95% CI 4.2–5.9) in 2013–2016 using HSI as the NAFLD prediction model; and from 3.3% (95% CI 2.5–4.5) in 2005–2008 and 6.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 6.8% (95% 5.3–8.7) in 2013–2016 using USFLI (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in entire NHANES cohort regardless of NAFLD status. While the prevalence of advanced fibrosis increased steadily in non-Hispanic whites through the duration of the study, it leveled off during 2013–2016 in non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: Prevalence of advanced fibrosis associated with NAFLD increased steadily from 2005 to 2016. More importantly, race/ethnicity-based temporal differences were noted in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis during the study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalHepatology International
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Mar 2019

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Fibrosis
Confidence Intervals
Nutrition Surveys
Fatty Liver
Liver
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Blood Platelets
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Hepatic steatosis
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
  • Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

Cite this

Kim, Donghee ; Kim, Won ; Adejumo, Adeyinka C. ; Cholankeril, George ; Tighe, Sean P. ; Wong, Robert J. ; Gonzalez, Stevan A. ; Harrison, Stephen A. ; Younossi, Zobair M. ; Ahmed, Aijaz. / Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016. In: Hepatology International. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 205-213.
@article{b250aa9bd89342c189ba08a80a1d03d2,
title = "Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016",
abstract = "Background and aim: Advanced fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported to have a higher risk of hepatic and non-hepatic mortality. We aim to study the recent trends in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in a large population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 28,739 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2016 were utilized. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and the US fatty liver index (USFLI) in the absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. The presence and absence of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD was determined by the NAFLD fibrosis score, FIB-4 score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index. Results: The prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis increased from 2.6{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.1] in 2005–2008 and 4.4{\%} (95{\%} CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 5.0{\%} (95{\%} CI 4.2–5.9) in 2013–2016 using HSI as the NAFLD prediction model; and from 3.3{\%} (95{\%} CI 2.5–4.5) in 2005–2008 and 6.4{\%} (95{\%} CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 6.8{\%} (95{\%} 5.3–8.7) in 2013–2016 using USFLI (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in entire NHANES cohort regardless of NAFLD status. While the prevalence of advanced fibrosis increased steadily in non-Hispanic whites through the duration of the study, it leveled off during 2013–2016 in non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: Prevalence of advanced fibrosis associated with NAFLD increased steadily from 2005 to 2016. More importantly, race/ethnicity-based temporal differences were noted in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis during the study.",
keywords = "Hepatic steatosis, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis",
author = "Donghee Kim and Won Kim and Adejumo, {Adeyinka C.} and George Cholankeril and Tighe, {Sean P.} and Wong, {Robert J.} and Gonzalez, {Stevan A.} and Harrison, {Stephen A.} and Younossi, {Zobair M.} and Aijaz Ahmed",
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Kim, D, Kim, W, Adejumo, AC, Cholankeril, G, Tighe, SP, Wong, RJ, Gonzalez, SA, Harrison, SA, Younossi, ZM & Ahmed, A 2019, 'Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016', Hepatology International, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 205-213. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12072-018-09926-z

Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016. / Kim, Donghee; Kim, Won; Adejumo, Adeyinka C.; Cholankeril, George; Tighe, Sean P.; Wong, Robert J.; Gonzalez, Stevan A.; Harrison, Stephen A.; Younossi, Zobair M.; Ahmed, Aijaz.

In: Hepatology International, Vol. 13, No. 2, 12.03.2019, p. 205-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Race/ethnicity-based temporal changes in prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in the United States, 2005–2016

AU - Kim, Donghee

AU - Kim, Won

AU - Adejumo, Adeyinka C.

AU - Cholankeril, George

AU - Tighe, Sean P.

AU - Wong, Robert J.

AU - Gonzalez, Stevan A.

AU - Harrison, Stephen A.

AU - Younossi, Zobair M.

AU - Ahmed, Aijaz

PY - 2019/3/12

Y1 - 2019/3/12

N2 - Background and aim: Advanced fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported to have a higher risk of hepatic and non-hepatic mortality. We aim to study the recent trends in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in a large population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 28,739 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2016 were utilized. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and the US fatty liver index (USFLI) in the absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. The presence and absence of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD was determined by the NAFLD fibrosis score, FIB-4 score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index. Results: The prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis increased from 2.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.1] in 2005–2008 and 4.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 5.0% (95% CI 4.2–5.9) in 2013–2016 using HSI as the NAFLD prediction model; and from 3.3% (95% CI 2.5–4.5) in 2005–2008 and 6.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 6.8% (95% 5.3–8.7) in 2013–2016 using USFLI (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in entire NHANES cohort regardless of NAFLD status. While the prevalence of advanced fibrosis increased steadily in non-Hispanic whites through the duration of the study, it leveled off during 2013–2016 in non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: Prevalence of advanced fibrosis associated with NAFLD increased steadily from 2005 to 2016. More importantly, race/ethnicity-based temporal differences were noted in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis during the study.

AB - Background and aim: Advanced fibrosis associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported to have a higher risk of hepatic and non-hepatic mortality. We aim to study the recent trends in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis in a large population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 28,739 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2016 were utilized. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and the US fatty liver index (USFLI) in the absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. The presence and absence of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD was determined by the NAFLD fibrosis score, FIB-4 score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index. Results: The prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis increased from 2.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–3.1] in 2005–2008 and 4.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 5.0% (95% CI 4.2–5.9) in 2013–2016 using HSI as the NAFLD prediction model; and from 3.3% (95% CI 2.5–4.5) in 2005–2008 and 6.4% (95% CI 3.7–5.1) in 2009–2012, to 6.8% (95% 5.3–8.7) in 2013–2016 using USFLI (p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in entire NHANES cohort regardless of NAFLD status. While the prevalence of advanced fibrosis increased steadily in non-Hispanic whites through the duration of the study, it leveled off during 2013–2016 in non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: Prevalence of advanced fibrosis associated with NAFLD increased steadily from 2005 to 2016. More importantly, race/ethnicity-based temporal differences were noted in the prevalence of NAFLD-related advanced fibrosis during the study.

KW - Hepatic steatosis

KW - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

KW - Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

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U2 - 10.1007/s12072-018-09926-z

DO - 10.1007/s12072-018-09926-z

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VL - 13

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EP - 213

JO - Hepatology International

JF - Hepatology International

SN - 1936-0533

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