Proteolysis: From the lysosome to ubiquitin and the proteasome

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

663 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How the genetic code is translated into proteins was a key focus of biological research before the 1980s, but how these proteins are degraded remained a neglected area. With the discovery of the lysosome, it was suggested that cellular proteins are degraded in this organelle. However, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly indicated that non-lysosomal pathways have an important role in intracellular proteolysis, although their identity and mechanisms of action remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved this enigma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-86
Number of pages8
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2005

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Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Ubiquitin
Lysosomes
Proteolysis
Genetic Code
Proteins
Organelles
Research

Cite this

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Proteolysis : From the lysosome to ubiquitin and the proteasome. / Ciechanover, Aaron.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 79-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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