Prenatal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and decreased skeletal muscle mass in 6-year-old children: A prospective birth cohort study

Dong Wook Lee, Youn Hee Lim, Choong Ho Shin, Young Ah Lee, Bung Nyun Kim, Johanna Inhyang Kim, Yun Chul Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Aim: Phthalate is a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical that has anti-androgenic effects. Although there are several studies on the relationship between body composition and phthalate, studies that investigated the effects of phthalate on skeletal muscle during childhood are lacking. Methods: We analyzed data from 481 mother-and-child pairs enrolled in the Environment and Development of Children cohort in South Korea. We examined the association between phthalate metabolites (mono [2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl] phthalate [MEHHP], mono [2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl] phthalate [MEOHP], molar sum of MEHHP and MEOHP [Σ DEHP], and mono-n-butyl phthalate [MnBP]) in prenatal maternal urine and children's urine at the age of 6, and body composition indices (body mass index [BMI] z-score, percentage of fat mass, fat mass index, percentage of skeletal muscle, and the skeletal muscle index [SMI]) measured when the child was 6 years using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Results: A 2-fold increase in Σ DEHP and MnBP in the prenatal maternal urine was significantly associated with a −0.07 unit (95% CI: −0.11, −0.03) and −0.09 unit (95% CI: −0.14, −0.03) change in SMI, respectively, in 6-year old girls alone. BMI z-score was also negatively associated with a 2-fold increase in MEHHP and MnBP in prenatal maternal urine as −0.11 unit (95% CI: −0.22, −0.01) and −0.15 unit (95% CI: −0.28, −0.02) change, respectively, only among girls. Among boys, phthalate metabolites in the prenatal and children's urine were not significantly associated with any body composition indices. Conclusions: Our longitudinal study shows that high levels of prenatal exposure to phthalates are significantly associated with decreased SMI among girls. We can postulate that anti-androgenic effects of phthalates during pregnancy may affect girl offspring's muscle growth.

Original languageEnglish
Article number109020
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume182
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

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phthalate
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
muscle
Cohort Studies
Parturition
Urine
Body Composition
Diethylhexyl Phthalate
Mothers
urine
Metabolites
Body Mass Index
Chemical analysis
Fats
Endocrine Disruptors
Republic of Korea
Acoustic impedance
Child Development
phthalic acid

Keywords

  • Children
  • Obesity
  • Phthalate
  • Pregnancy
  • Skeletal muscle

Cite this

@article{2b45164e2bf84efa85695a886e6ae488,
title = "Prenatal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and decreased skeletal muscle mass in 6-year-old children: A prospective birth cohort study",
abstract = "Background/Aim: Phthalate is a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical that has anti-androgenic effects. Although there are several studies on the relationship between body composition and phthalate, studies that investigated the effects of phthalate on skeletal muscle during childhood are lacking. Methods: We analyzed data from 481 mother-and-child pairs enrolled in the Environment and Development of Children cohort in South Korea. We examined the association between phthalate metabolites (mono [2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl] phthalate [MEHHP], mono [2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl] phthalate [MEOHP], molar sum of MEHHP and MEOHP [Σ DEHP], and mono-n-butyl phthalate [MnBP]) in prenatal maternal urine and children's urine at the age of 6, and body composition indices (body mass index [BMI] z-score, percentage of fat mass, fat mass index, percentage of skeletal muscle, and the skeletal muscle index [SMI]) measured when the child was 6 years using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Results: A 2-fold increase in Σ DEHP and MnBP in the prenatal maternal urine was significantly associated with a −0.07 unit (95{\%} CI: −0.11, −0.03) and −0.09 unit (95{\%} CI: −0.14, −0.03) change in SMI, respectively, in 6-year old girls alone. BMI z-score was also negatively associated with a 2-fold increase in MEHHP and MnBP in prenatal maternal urine as −0.11 unit (95{\%} CI: −0.22, −0.01) and −0.15 unit (95{\%} CI: −0.28, −0.02) change, respectively, only among girls. Among boys, phthalate metabolites in the prenatal and children's urine were not significantly associated with any body composition indices. Conclusions: Our longitudinal study shows that high levels of prenatal exposure to phthalates are significantly associated with decreased SMI among girls. We can postulate that anti-androgenic effects of phthalates during pregnancy may affect girl offspring's muscle growth.",
keywords = "Children, Obesity, Phthalate, Pregnancy, Skeletal muscle",
author = "Lee, {Dong Wook} and Lim, {Youn Hee} and Shin, {Choong Ho} and Lee, {Young Ah} and Kim, {Bung Nyun} and Kim, {Johanna Inhyang} and Hong, {Yun Chul}",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.envres.2019.109020",
language = "English",
volume = "182",
journal = "Environmental Research",
issn = "0013-9351",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and decreased skeletal muscle mass in 6-year-old children

T2 - A prospective birth cohort study

AU - Lee, Dong Wook

AU - Lim, Youn Hee

AU - Shin, Choong Ho

AU - Lee, Young Ah

AU - Kim, Bung Nyun

AU - Kim, Johanna Inhyang

AU - Hong, Yun Chul

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Background/Aim: Phthalate is a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical that has anti-androgenic effects. Although there are several studies on the relationship between body composition and phthalate, studies that investigated the effects of phthalate on skeletal muscle during childhood are lacking. Methods: We analyzed data from 481 mother-and-child pairs enrolled in the Environment and Development of Children cohort in South Korea. We examined the association between phthalate metabolites (mono [2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl] phthalate [MEHHP], mono [2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl] phthalate [MEOHP], molar sum of MEHHP and MEOHP [Σ DEHP], and mono-n-butyl phthalate [MnBP]) in prenatal maternal urine and children's urine at the age of 6, and body composition indices (body mass index [BMI] z-score, percentage of fat mass, fat mass index, percentage of skeletal muscle, and the skeletal muscle index [SMI]) measured when the child was 6 years using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Results: A 2-fold increase in Σ DEHP and MnBP in the prenatal maternal urine was significantly associated with a −0.07 unit (95% CI: −0.11, −0.03) and −0.09 unit (95% CI: −0.14, −0.03) change in SMI, respectively, in 6-year old girls alone. BMI z-score was also negatively associated with a 2-fold increase in MEHHP and MnBP in prenatal maternal urine as −0.11 unit (95% CI: −0.22, −0.01) and −0.15 unit (95% CI: −0.28, −0.02) change, respectively, only among girls. Among boys, phthalate metabolites in the prenatal and children's urine were not significantly associated with any body composition indices. Conclusions: Our longitudinal study shows that high levels of prenatal exposure to phthalates are significantly associated with decreased SMI among girls. We can postulate that anti-androgenic effects of phthalates during pregnancy may affect girl offspring's muscle growth.

AB - Background/Aim: Phthalate is a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical that has anti-androgenic effects. Although there are several studies on the relationship between body composition and phthalate, studies that investigated the effects of phthalate on skeletal muscle during childhood are lacking. Methods: We analyzed data from 481 mother-and-child pairs enrolled in the Environment and Development of Children cohort in South Korea. We examined the association between phthalate metabolites (mono [2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl] phthalate [MEHHP], mono [2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl] phthalate [MEOHP], molar sum of MEHHP and MEOHP [Σ DEHP], and mono-n-butyl phthalate [MnBP]) in prenatal maternal urine and children's urine at the age of 6, and body composition indices (body mass index [BMI] z-score, percentage of fat mass, fat mass index, percentage of skeletal muscle, and the skeletal muscle index [SMI]) measured when the child was 6 years using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Results: A 2-fold increase in Σ DEHP and MnBP in the prenatal maternal urine was significantly associated with a −0.07 unit (95% CI: −0.11, −0.03) and −0.09 unit (95% CI: −0.14, −0.03) change in SMI, respectively, in 6-year old girls alone. BMI z-score was also negatively associated with a 2-fold increase in MEHHP and MnBP in prenatal maternal urine as −0.11 unit (95% CI: −0.22, −0.01) and −0.15 unit (95% CI: −0.28, −0.02) change, respectively, only among girls. Among boys, phthalate metabolites in the prenatal and children's urine were not significantly associated with any body composition indices. Conclusions: Our longitudinal study shows that high levels of prenatal exposure to phthalates are significantly associated with decreased SMI among girls. We can postulate that anti-androgenic effects of phthalates during pregnancy may affect girl offspring's muscle growth.

KW - Children

KW - Obesity

KW - Phthalate

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Skeletal muscle

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076548997&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.envres.2019.109020

DO - 10.1016/j.envres.2019.109020

M3 - Article

C2 - 31863942

AN - SCOPUS:85076548997

VL - 182

JO - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

M1 - 109020

ER -