Possession of the macrophage- induced gene by isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex is not associated with significant clinical disease

Jong Hyun Yoon, Eui Chong Kim, Jae Seok Kim, Eun Young Song, Jongyoun Yi, Sue Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently isolated species among non- tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) clinical isolates. Physicians pay attention to the differential diagnosis of the disease caused by MAC from tuberculosis because of their similar clinical presentations. Expression of the macrophage- induced gene (mig) is one of the virulence phenotypes in MAC, but it has not been determined whether the presence of the mig gene itself has any relationship with clinical disease or whether it is merely a marker for MAC. To uncover the significance of the mig gene among MAC clinical isolates, positive cultures from respiratory specimens from patients in a tertiary referral centre were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The mig gene was also evaluated using PCR and sequence analysis. The medical records from the patients were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnostic criteria from the American Thoracic Association were adopted for the diagnosis of NTM lung disease. A total of 45 MAC clinical isolates were identified over a period of 1 year. Following 16S rRNA sequencing, all of the 23 M. avium isolates were categorized as sequevar I. Among the 22 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates, 18 strains were identified as M. intracellulare sequevar I and the remaining four consisted of one each of sequevars II, III, IV and V. The proportion of cases that fitted the diagnostic criteria of NTM lung disease was 26.7 % (12/45). The mig PCR results were 100 % positive for the MAC isolates studied, irrespective of their species, sequevar or disease-causing properties. However, following bootstrap analysis of the mig sequences, we observed definite grouping between M. avium and M. intracellulare. Thus the mig gene is a species-specific marker with distinct sequence diversity between the two species M. avium and M. intracellulare, but there is poor correlation between disease-causing properties and specific mig sequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-260
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Microbiology
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Mycobacterium avium Complex
Macrophages
Genes
Mycobacterium
Lung Diseases
Mycobacterium avium
Polymerase Chain Reaction
rRNA Genes
Tertiary Care Centers
Medical Records
Sequence Analysis
Virulence
Tuberculosis
Differential Diagnosis
Thorax

Cite this

@article{893032ba56e54b629a38774fafcd8d54,
title = "Possession of the macrophage- induced gene by isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex is not associated with significant clinical disease",
abstract = "The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently isolated species among non- tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) clinical isolates. Physicians pay attention to the differential diagnosis of the disease caused by MAC from tuberculosis because of their similar clinical presentations. Expression of the macrophage- induced gene (mig) is one of the virulence phenotypes in MAC, but it has not been determined whether the presence of the mig gene itself has any relationship with clinical disease or whether it is merely a marker for MAC. To uncover the significance of the mig gene among MAC clinical isolates, positive cultures from respiratory specimens from patients in a tertiary referral centre were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The mig gene was also evaluated using PCR and sequence analysis. The medical records from the patients were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnostic criteria from the American Thoracic Association were adopted for the diagnosis of NTM lung disease. A total of 45 MAC clinical isolates were identified over a period of 1 year. Following 16S rRNA sequencing, all of the 23 M. avium isolates were categorized as sequevar I. Among the 22 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates, 18 strains were identified as M. intracellulare sequevar I and the remaining four consisted of one each of sequevars II, III, IV and V. The proportion of cases that fitted the diagnostic criteria of NTM lung disease was 26.7 {\%} (12/45). The mig PCR results were 100 {\%} positive for the MAC isolates studied, irrespective of their species, sequevar or disease-causing properties. However, following bootstrap analysis of the mig sequences, we observed definite grouping between M. avium and M. intracellulare. Thus the mig gene is a species-specific marker with distinct sequence diversity between the two species M. avium and M. intracellulare, but there is poor correlation between disease-causing properties and specific mig sequences.",
author = "Yoon, {Jong Hyun} and Kim, {Eui Chong} and Kim, {Jae Seok} and Song, {Eun Young} and Jongyoun Yi and Sue Shin",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1099/jmm.0.001958-0",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "256--260",
journal = "Journal of Medical Microbiology",
issn = "0022-2615",
publisher = "Society for General Microbiology",
number = "2",

}

Possession of the macrophage- induced gene by isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex is not associated with significant clinical disease. / Yoon, Jong Hyun; Kim, Eui Chong; Kim, Jae Seok; Song, Eun Young; Yi, Jongyoun; Shin, Sue.

In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, Vol. 58, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 256-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Possession of the macrophage- induced gene by isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex is not associated with significant clinical disease

AU - Yoon, Jong Hyun

AU - Kim, Eui Chong

AU - Kim, Jae Seok

AU - Song, Eun Young

AU - Yi, Jongyoun

AU - Shin, Sue

PY - 2009/2/1

Y1 - 2009/2/1

N2 - The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently isolated species among non- tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) clinical isolates. Physicians pay attention to the differential diagnosis of the disease caused by MAC from tuberculosis because of their similar clinical presentations. Expression of the macrophage- induced gene (mig) is one of the virulence phenotypes in MAC, but it has not been determined whether the presence of the mig gene itself has any relationship with clinical disease or whether it is merely a marker for MAC. To uncover the significance of the mig gene among MAC clinical isolates, positive cultures from respiratory specimens from patients in a tertiary referral centre were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The mig gene was also evaluated using PCR and sequence analysis. The medical records from the patients were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnostic criteria from the American Thoracic Association were adopted for the diagnosis of NTM lung disease. A total of 45 MAC clinical isolates were identified over a period of 1 year. Following 16S rRNA sequencing, all of the 23 M. avium isolates were categorized as sequevar I. Among the 22 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates, 18 strains were identified as M. intracellulare sequevar I and the remaining four consisted of one each of sequevars II, III, IV and V. The proportion of cases that fitted the diagnostic criteria of NTM lung disease was 26.7 % (12/45). The mig PCR results were 100 % positive for the MAC isolates studied, irrespective of their species, sequevar or disease-causing properties. However, following bootstrap analysis of the mig sequences, we observed definite grouping between M. avium and M. intracellulare. Thus the mig gene is a species-specific marker with distinct sequence diversity between the two species M. avium and M. intracellulare, but there is poor correlation between disease-causing properties and specific mig sequences.

AB - The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently isolated species among non- tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) clinical isolates. Physicians pay attention to the differential diagnosis of the disease caused by MAC from tuberculosis because of their similar clinical presentations. Expression of the macrophage- induced gene (mig) is one of the virulence phenotypes in MAC, but it has not been determined whether the presence of the mig gene itself has any relationship with clinical disease or whether it is merely a marker for MAC. To uncover the significance of the mig gene among MAC clinical isolates, positive cultures from respiratory specimens from patients in a tertiary referral centre were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The mig gene was also evaluated using PCR and sequence analysis. The medical records from the patients were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnostic criteria from the American Thoracic Association were adopted for the diagnosis of NTM lung disease. A total of 45 MAC clinical isolates were identified over a period of 1 year. Following 16S rRNA sequencing, all of the 23 M. avium isolates were categorized as sequevar I. Among the 22 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates, 18 strains were identified as M. intracellulare sequevar I and the remaining four consisted of one each of sequevars II, III, IV and V. The proportion of cases that fitted the diagnostic criteria of NTM lung disease was 26.7 % (12/45). The mig PCR results were 100 % positive for the MAC isolates studied, irrespective of their species, sequevar or disease-causing properties. However, following bootstrap analysis of the mig sequences, we observed definite grouping between M. avium and M. intracellulare. Thus the mig gene is a species-specific marker with distinct sequence diversity between the two species M. avium and M. intracellulare, but there is poor correlation between disease-causing properties and specific mig sequences.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=59949093394&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1099/jmm.0.001958-0

DO - 10.1099/jmm.0.001958-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 19141746

AN - SCOPUS:59949093394

VL - 58

SP - 256

EP - 260

JO - Journal of Medical Microbiology

JF - Journal of Medical Microbiology

SN - 0022-2615

IS - 2

ER -