Phosphatidylserine receptor-targeting therapies for the treatment of cancer

Miso Park, Keon Wook Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane is a unique characteristic of eukaryotic cells. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are exposed in the outer leaflet, and phosphatidylserine (PS) is predominantly located in the inner leaflet. Redistribution of PS to the cell surface can be observed in several physiological conditions, such as apoptosis and platelet activation, or in pathological conditions, such as the release of microvesicles/exosomes from tumor tissues. PS binding to the phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) on immune cells initiates immunosuppressive pathways that can lead to immune evasion by cancer cells. Conversely, PSR activation of cancer cells plays an important role in their survival, proliferation and metastasis. Herein, we briefly summarize both recent advances in our understanding of the pathological roles of PS and its receptor in cancer biology, as well as relevant pharmacological approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-628
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Pharmacal Research
Volume42
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Phosphatidylserines
Chemical activation
Cells
Neoplasms
Sphingomyelins
Cell membranes
Immunosuppressive Agents
Exosomes
Platelets
Phosphatidylcholines
Immune Evasion
Tumors
Phospholipids
Platelet Activation
Eukaryotic Cells
Therapeutics
Tissue
Apoptosis
Cell Membrane
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Phosphatidylserine
  • Phosphatidylserine receptor
  • TAM receptor

Cite this

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title = "Phosphatidylserine receptor-targeting therapies for the treatment of cancer",
abstract = "Asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane is a unique characteristic of eukaryotic cells. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are exposed in the outer leaflet, and phosphatidylserine (PS) is predominantly located in the inner leaflet. Redistribution of PS to the cell surface can be observed in several physiological conditions, such as apoptosis and platelet activation, or in pathological conditions, such as the release of microvesicles/exosomes from tumor tissues. PS binding to the phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) on immune cells initiates immunosuppressive pathways that can lead to immune evasion by cancer cells. Conversely, PSR activation of cancer cells plays an important role in their survival, proliferation and metastasis. Herein, we briefly summarize both recent advances in our understanding of the pathological roles of PS and its receptor in cancer biology, as well as relevant pharmacological approaches.",
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Phosphatidylserine receptor-targeting therapies for the treatment of cancer. / Park, Miso; Kang, Keon Wook.

In: Archives of Pharmacal Research, Vol. 42, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 617-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Kang, Keon Wook

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