Phagosome escape of rough Mycobacterium abscessus strains in murine macrophage via phagosomal rupture can lead to type I interferon production and their cell-to-cell spread

Bo Ram Kim, Byoung Jun Kim, Yoon-Hoh Kook, Bum-Joon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MAB) is a rapidly growing mycobacterium(RGM) whose clinical significance as an emerging human pathogen has been increasing worldwide. It has two types of colony morphology, a smooth (S) type, producing high glycopeptidolipid (GPL) content, and a rough (R) type, which produces low levels of GPLs and is associated with increased virulence. However, the mechanism responsible for their difference in virulence is poorly known. By ultrastructural examination of murine macrophages infected, we found that MAB-R strains could replicate more actively in the macrophage phagosome than the S variants and that they could escape into cytosol via phagosomal rupture. The cytosolic access of MAB-R strains via phagosomal rupture led to enhanced Type I interferon (IFN) production and cell death, which resulted in their cell-to-cell spreading. This behavior can provide an additional niche for the survival of MAB-R strains. In addition, we found that their enhancement of cell death mediated cell spreading are dependent on Type I IFN signaling via comparison of wild-type and IFNAR1 knockout mice. In conclusion, our data indicated that a transition of MAB-S strains into MAB-R variants increased their virulence via enhanced Type I IFN production, which led to enhanced survival in infected macrophage via cell death mediated cell-to-cell spreading. This result provides not only a novel insight into the difference in virulence between MAB-R and -S variants but also hints to their treatment strategy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume10
Issue numberJAN
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Phagosomes
Interferon Type I
Mycobacterium
Rupture
Macrophages
Virulence
Cell Death
Survival
Knockout Mice
Cytosol

Keywords

  • Cell death
  • Cell-to-cell spread
  • Mycobacterium abscessus
  • Phagosomal escape
  • Phagosomal rupture
  • Rough strains
  • Type I interferon

Cite this

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title = "Phagosome escape of rough Mycobacterium abscessus strains in murine macrophage via phagosomal rupture can lead to type I interferon production and their cell-to-cell spread",
abstract = "Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MAB) is a rapidly growing mycobacterium(RGM) whose clinical significance as an emerging human pathogen has been increasing worldwide. It has two types of colony morphology, a smooth (S) type, producing high glycopeptidolipid (GPL) content, and a rough (R) type, which produces low levels of GPLs and is associated with increased virulence. However, the mechanism responsible for their difference in virulence is poorly known. By ultrastructural examination of murine macrophages infected, we found that MAB-R strains could replicate more actively in the macrophage phagosome than the S variants and that they could escape into cytosol via phagosomal rupture. The cytosolic access of MAB-R strains via phagosomal rupture led to enhanced Type I interferon (IFN) production and cell death, which resulted in their cell-to-cell spreading. This behavior can provide an additional niche for the survival of MAB-R strains. In addition, we found that their enhancement of cell death mediated cell spreading are dependent on Type I IFN signaling via comparison of wild-type and IFNAR1 knockout mice. In conclusion, our data indicated that a transition of MAB-S strains into MAB-R variants increased their virulence via enhanced Type I IFN production, which led to enhanced survival in infected macrophage via cell death mediated cell-to-cell spreading. This result provides not only a novel insight into the difference in virulence between MAB-R and -S variants but also hints to their treatment strategy.",
keywords = "Cell death, Cell-to-cell spread, Mycobacterium abscessus, Phagosomal escape, Phagosomal rupture, Rough strains, Type I interferon",
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T1 - Phagosome escape of rough Mycobacterium abscessus strains in murine macrophage via phagosomal rupture can lead to type I interferon production and their cell-to-cell spread

AU - Kim, Bo Ram

AU - Kim, Byoung Jun

AU - Kook, Yoon-Hoh

AU - Kim, Bum-Joon

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N2 - Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MAB) is a rapidly growing mycobacterium(RGM) whose clinical significance as an emerging human pathogen has been increasing worldwide. It has two types of colony morphology, a smooth (S) type, producing high glycopeptidolipid (GPL) content, and a rough (R) type, which produces low levels of GPLs and is associated with increased virulence. However, the mechanism responsible for their difference in virulence is poorly known. By ultrastructural examination of murine macrophages infected, we found that MAB-R strains could replicate more actively in the macrophage phagosome than the S variants and that they could escape into cytosol via phagosomal rupture. The cytosolic access of MAB-R strains via phagosomal rupture led to enhanced Type I interferon (IFN) production and cell death, which resulted in their cell-to-cell spreading. This behavior can provide an additional niche for the survival of MAB-R strains. In addition, we found that their enhancement of cell death mediated cell spreading are dependent on Type I IFN signaling via comparison of wild-type and IFNAR1 knockout mice. In conclusion, our data indicated that a transition of MAB-S strains into MAB-R variants increased their virulence via enhanced Type I IFN production, which led to enhanced survival in infected macrophage via cell death mediated cell-to-cell spreading. This result provides not only a novel insight into the difference in virulence between MAB-R and -S variants but also hints to their treatment strategy.

AB - Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MAB) is a rapidly growing mycobacterium(RGM) whose clinical significance as an emerging human pathogen has been increasing worldwide. It has two types of colony morphology, a smooth (S) type, producing high glycopeptidolipid (GPL) content, and a rough (R) type, which produces low levels of GPLs and is associated with increased virulence. However, the mechanism responsible for their difference in virulence is poorly known. By ultrastructural examination of murine macrophages infected, we found that MAB-R strains could replicate more actively in the macrophage phagosome than the S variants and that they could escape into cytosol via phagosomal rupture. The cytosolic access of MAB-R strains via phagosomal rupture led to enhanced Type I interferon (IFN) production and cell death, which resulted in their cell-to-cell spreading. This behavior can provide an additional niche for the survival of MAB-R strains. In addition, we found that their enhancement of cell death mediated cell spreading are dependent on Type I IFN signaling via comparison of wild-type and IFNAR1 knockout mice. In conclusion, our data indicated that a transition of MAB-S strains into MAB-R variants increased their virulence via enhanced Type I IFN production, which led to enhanced survival in infected macrophage via cell death mediated cell-to-cell spreading. This result provides not only a novel insight into the difference in virulence between MAB-R and -S variants but also hints to their treatment strategy.

KW - Cell death

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