Outbreak of Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens infections caused by a shared measuring cup in a general surgery unit in Korea

Soon Oh Hyang, Ah Kum Kyung, Eui Chong Kim, Hoan Jong Lee, Won Choe Kang, Myoung-Don Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To control an outbreak of Shewanella algae and S. putrefaciens infections by identifying the risk factors for infection and transmission. DESIGN. Matched case-control study. SETTING. A university-affiliated tertiary acute care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with approximately 1,600 beds. PATIENTS. From June 20, 2003, to January 16, 2004, a total of 31 case patients with Shewanella colonization or infection and 62 control patients were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS. Requirement to use single-use measuring cups and standard precautions (including hand washing before and after patient care and use of gloves). RESULTS. S. algae or S. putrefaciens was isolated from blood, for 9 (29.0%) of 31 patients who acquired one of the organisms; from bile, for 8 (25.8%), and from ascitic fluid, for 8 (25.8%). The attack rate of this outbreak was 5.8% (31 patients infected or colonized, of 534 potentially exposed on ward A) and the pathogenicity of the two species together was 77.4% (24 patients infected, of 31 who acquired the pathogens). The estimated incubation period for Shewanella acquisition was 3-49 days. Using logistic analysis, we identified the following risk factors: presence of external drainage catheters in the hepatobiliary system (odds ratio [OR], 20; P < .001), presence of hepatobiliary disease (OR, 6.4; P < .001), admission to the emergency department of the hospital (OR, 2.9; P = .039), wound classification of "contaminated" or "dirty or infected" (OR, 16.5; P = .012), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (OR, 8.0; P = .006), duration of stay in ward A (OR, 1.1; P < .001), and, for women, an age of 60-69 years (OR, 13.3; P = .028). A Shewanella isolate was recovered from the surface of a shared measuring cup, and 12 isolates of S. algae showed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. CONCLUSIONS. This Shewanella outbreak had a single-source origin and spread by contact transmission via a contaminated measuring cup. Shewanella species are emerging as potentially serious human pathogens in hospitals and could be included in hospital infection surveillance systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)742-748
Number of pages7
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2008

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Shewanella putrefaciens
Shewanella
Korea
Disease Outbreaks
Odds Ratio
Infection
Hand Disinfection
Republic of Korea
Infectious Disease Transmission
Ascitic Fluid
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Tertiary Healthcare
Infection Control
Cross Infection
Bile
Virulence
Case-Control Studies
Hospital Emergency Service
Drainage
Patient Care

Cite this

@article{f71f8ef881a84e00921b94e79e723593,
title = "Outbreak of Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens infections caused by a shared measuring cup in a general surgery unit in Korea",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. To control an outbreak of Shewanella algae and S. putrefaciens infections by identifying the risk factors for infection and transmission. DESIGN. Matched case-control study. SETTING. A university-affiliated tertiary acute care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with approximately 1,600 beds. PATIENTS. From June 20, 2003, to January 16, 2004, a total of 31 case patients with Shewanella colonization or infection and 62 control patients were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS. Requirement to use single-use measuring cups and standard precautions (including hand washing before and after patient care and use of gloves). RESULTS. S. algae or S. putrefaciens was isolated from blood, for 9 (29.0{\%}) of 31 patients who acquired one of the organisms; from bile, for 8 (25.8{\%}), and from ascitic fluid, for 8 (25.8{\%}). The attack rate of this outbreak was 5.8{\%} (31 patients infected or colonized, of 534 potentially exposed on ward A) and the pathogenicity of the two species together was 77.4{\%} (24 patients infected, of 31 who acquired the pathogens). The estimated incubation period for Shewanella acquisition was 3-49 days. Using logistic analysis, we identified the following risk factors: presence of external drainage catheters in the hepatobiliary system (odds ratio [OR], 20; P < .001), presence of hepatobiliary disease (OR, 6.4; P < .001), admission to the emergency department of the hospital (OR, 2.9; P = .039), wound classification of {"}contaminated{"} or {"}dirty or infected{"} (OR, 16.5; P = .012), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (OR, 8.0; P = .006), duration of stay in ward A (OR, 1.1; P < .001), and, for women, an age of 60-69 years (OR, 13.3; P = .028). A Shewanella isolate was recovered from the surface of a shared measuring cup, and 12 isolates of S. algae showed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. CONCLUSIONS. This Shewanella outbreak had a single-source origin and spread by contact transmission via a contaminated measuring cup. Shewanella species are emerging as potentially serious human pathogens in hospitals and could be included in hospital infection surveillance systems.",
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Outbreak of Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens infections caused by a shared measuring cup in a general surgery unit in Korea. / Hyang, Soon Oh; Kyung, Ah Kum; Kim, Eui Chong; Lee, Hoan Jong; Kang, Won Choe; Oh, Myoung-Don.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 29, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 742-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outbreak of Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens infections caused by a shared measuring cup in a general surgery unit in Korea

AU - Hyang, Soon Oh

AU - Kyung, Ah Kum

AU - Kim, Eui Chong

AU - Lee, Hoan Jong

AU - Kang, Won Choe

AU - Oh, Myoung-Don

PY - 2008/8/1

Y1 - 2008/8/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE. To control an outbreak of Shewanella algae and S. putrefaciens infections by identifying the risk factors for infection and transmission. DESIGN. Matched case-control study. SETTING. A university-affiliated tertiary acute care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with approximately 1,600 beds. PATIENTS. From June 20, 2003, to January 16, 2004, a total of 31 case patients with Shewanella colonization or infection and 62 control patients were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS. Requirement to use single-use measuring cups and standard precautions (including hand washing before and after patient care and use of gloves). RESULTS. S. algae or S. putrefaciens was isolated from blood, for 9 (29.0%) of 31 patients who acquired one of the organisms; from bile, for 8 (25.8%), and from ascitic fluid, for 8 (25.8%). The attack rate of this outbreak was 5.8% (31 patients infected or colonized, of 534 potentially exposed on ward A) and the pathogenicity of the two species together was 77.4% (24 patients infected, of 31 who acquired the pathogens). The estimated incubation period for Shewanella acquisition was 3-49 days. Using logistic analysis, we identified the following risk factors: presence of external drainage catheters in the hepatobiliary system (odds ratio [OR], 20; P < .001), presence of hepatobiliary disease (OR, 6.4; P < .001), admission to the emergency department of the hospital (OR, 2.9; P = .039), wound classification of "contaminated" or "dirty or infected" (OR, 16.5; P = .012), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (OR, 8.0; P = .006), duration of stay in ward A (OR, 1.1; P < .001), and, for women, an age of 60-69 years (OR, 13.3; P = .028). A Shewanella isolate was recovered from the surface of a shared measuring cup, and 12 isolates of S. algae showed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. CONCLUSIONS. This Shewanella outbreak had a single-source origin and spread by contact transmission via a contaminated measuring cup. Shewanella species are emerging as potentially serious human pathogens in hospitals and could be included in hospital infection surveillance systems.

AB - OBJECTIVE. To control an outbreak of Shewanella algae and S. putrefaciens infections by identifying the risk factors for infection and transmission. DESIGN. Matched case-control study. SETTING. A university-affiliated tertiary acute care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with approximately 1,600 beds. PATIENTS. From June 20, 2003, to January 16, 2004, a total of 31 case patients with Shewanella colonization or infection and 62 control patients were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS. Requirement to use single-use measuring cups and standard precautions (including hand washing before and after patient care and use of gloves). RESULTS. S. algae or S. putrefaciens was isolated from blood, for 9 (29.0%) of 31 patients who acquired one of the organisms; from bile, for 8 (25.8%), and from ascitic fluid, for 8 (25.8%). The attack rate of this outbreak was 5.8% (31 patients infected or colonized, of 534 potentially exposed on ward A) and the pathogenicity of the two species together was 77.4% (24 patients infected, of 31 who acquired the pathogens). The estimated incubation period for Shewanella acquisition was 3-49 days. Using logistic analysis, we identified the following risk factors: presence of external drainage catheters in the hepatobiliary system (odds ratio [OR], 20; P < .001), presence of hepatobiliary disease (OR, 6.4; P < .001), admission to the emergency department of the hospital (OR, 2.9; P = .039), wound classification of "contaminated" or "dirty or infected" (OR, 16.5; P = .012), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (OR, 8.0; P = .006), duration of stay in ward A (OR, 1.1; P < .001), and, for women, an age of 60-69 years (OR, 13.3; P = .028). A Shewanella isolate was recovered from the surface of a shared measuring cup, and 12 isolates of S. algae showed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. CONCLUSIONS. This Shewanella outbreak had a single-source origin and spread by contact transmission via a contaminated measuring cup. Shewanella species are emerging as potentially serious human pathogens in hospitals and could be included in hospital infection surveillance systems.

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