Non-obese fatty liver disease is associated with lacunar infarct

Min Sun Kwak, Kyung Won Kim, Hyobin Seo, Goh Eun Chung, Jeong Yoon Yim, Donghee Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Lacunar infarct, a small subcortical ischaemic lesion, is a known risk factor for future cognitive impairment, dementia and stroke. We evaluated the relationship between fatty liver disease (FLD) and lacunar infarct in a healthy general population. Methods: Subjects who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abdominal ultrasonography (US) during health check-ups from 2007 to 2009 were included. FLD was diagnosed by US. Subjects with a history of cerebrovascular disease, radiological findings consistent with cerebrovascular stenosis or cerebral small vessel disease were excluded. Results: Of the 1277 subjects, 54 (4.2%) exhibited lacunar infarct, and 514 (40.3%) had FLD. Subjects with lacunar infarct had a higher prevalence of FLD (59.3% vs 39.4%, P =.004). There was significant interaction between obesity (BMI < 25 kg/m 2 vs ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) and FLD for lacunar infarct (P for interaction =.024). Subgroup analysis revealed that non-obese FLD was more common in the subjects with lacunar infarct than those without (51.7% vs 23.5%, P =.001). However, there was no significant difference in the obese FLD prevalence between these 2 groups. In multivariate models adjusted by age, sex, smoking, alcohol, hypertension and diabetes, FLD was significantly associated with lacunar infarct (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-3.58; P =.027). Non-obese FLD was associated with lacunar infarct (OR 3.58; 95% CI 1.63-7.89; P =.002); however, this association remained insignificant in obese FLD. Instead, ageing and hypertension were independent risk factors for lacunar infarct in the obese population. Conclusions: FLD is significantly associated with lacunar infarct, independent of traditional risk factors. This association was prominent in the non-obese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1292-1299
Number of pages8
JournalLiver International
Volume38
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018

Fingerprint

Lacunar Stroke
Fatty Liver
Liver Diseases
Ultrasonography
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Hypertension
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Dementia
Pathologic Constriction
Obesity
Smoking
Stroke
Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • cerebral infarct
  • hepatic steatosis
  • lacunar infarct

Cite this

Kwak, Min Sun ; Kim, Kyung Won ; Seo, Hyobin ; Chung, Goh Eun ; Yim, Jeong Yoon ; Kim, Donghee. / Non-obese fatty liver disease is associated with lacunar infarct. In: Liver International. 2018 ; Vol. 38, No. 7. pp. 1292-1299.
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abstract = "Background/Aims: Lacunar infarct, a small subcortical ischaemic lesion, is a known risk factor for future cognitive impairment, dementia and stroke. We evaluated the relationship between fatty liver disease (FLD) and lacunar infarct in a healthy general population. Methods: Subjects who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abdominal ultrasonography (US) during health check-ups from 2007 to 2009 were included. FLD was diagnosed by US. Subjects with a history of cerebrovascular disease, radiological findings consistent with cerebrovascular stenosis or cerebral small vessel disease were excluded. Results: Of the 1277 subjects, 54 (4.2{\%}) exhibited lacunar infarct, and 514 (40.3{\%}) had FLD. Subjects with lacunar infarct had a higher prevalence of FLD (59.3{\%} vs 39.4{\%}, P =.004). There was significant interaction between obesity (BMI < 25 kg/m 2 vs ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) and FLD for lacunar infarct (P for interaction =.024). Subgroup analysis revealed that non-obese FLD was more common in the subjects with lacunar infarct than those without (51.7{\%} vs 23.5{\%}, P =.001). However, there was no significant difference in the obese FLD prevalence between these 2 groups. In multivariate models adjusted by age, sex, smoking, alcohol, hypertension and diabetes, FLD was significantly associated with lacunar infarct (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.08-3.58; P =.027). Non-obese FLD was associated with lacunar infarct (OR 3.58; 95{\%} CI 1.63-7.89; P =.002); however, this association remained insignificant in obese FLD. Instead, ageing and hypertension were independent risk factors for lacunar infarct in the obese population. Conclusions: FLD is significantly associated with lacunar infarct, independent of traditional risk factors. This association was prominent in the non-obese population.",
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Non-obese fatty liver disease is associated with lacunar infarct. / Kwak, Min Sun; Kim, Kyung Won; Seo, Hyobin; Chung, Goh Eun; Yim, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Donghee.

In: Liver International, Vol. 38, No. 7, 07.2018, p. 1292-1299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-obese fatty liver disease is associated with lacunar infarct

AU - Kwak, Min Sun

AU - Kim, Kyung Won

AU - Seo, Hyobin

AU - Chung, Goh Eun

AU - Yim, Jeong Yoon

AU - Kim, Donghee

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - Background/Aims: Lacunar infarct, a small subcortical ischaemic lesion, is a known risk factor for future cognitive impairment, dementia and stroke. We evaluated the relationship between fatty liver disease (FLD) and lacunar infarct in a healthy general population. Methods: Subjects who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abdominal ultrasonography (US) during health check-ups from 2007 to 2009 were included. FLD was diagnosed by US. Subjects with a history of cerebrovascular disease, radiological findings consistent with cerebrovascular stenosis or cerebral small vessel disease were excluded. Results: Of the 1277 subjects, 54 (4.2%) exhibited lacunar infarct, and 514 (40.3%) had FLD. Subjects with lacunar infarct had a higher prevalence of FLD (59.3% vs 39.4%, P =.004). There was significant interaction between obesity (BMI < 25 kg/m 2 vs ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) and FLD for lacunar infarct (P for interaction =.024). Subgroup analysis revealed that non-obese FLD was more common in the subjects with lacunar infarct than those without (51.7% vs 23.5%, P =.001). However, there was no significant difference in the obese FLD prevalence between these 2 groups. In multivariate models adjusted by age, sex, smoking, alcohol, hypertension and diabetes, FLD was significantly associated with lacunar infarct (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-3.58; P =.027). Non-obese FLD was associated with lacunar infarct (OR 3.58; 95% CI 1.63-7.89; P =.002); however, this association remained insignificant in obese FLD. Instead, ageing and hypertension were independent risk factors for lacunar infarct in the obese population. Conclusions: FLD is significantly associated with lacunar infarct, independent of traditional risk factors. This association was prominent in the non-obese population.

AB - Background/Aims: Lacunar infarct, a small subcortical ischaemic lesion, is a known risk factor for future cognitive impairment, dementia and stroke. We evaluated the relationship between fatty liver disease (FLD) and lacunar infarct in a healthy general population. Methods: Subjects who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abdominal ultrasonography (US) during health check-ups from 2007 to 2009 were included. FLD was diagnosed by US. Subjects with a history of cerebrovascular disease, radiological findings consistent with cerebrovascular stenosis or cerebral small vessel disease were excluded. Results: Of the 1277 subjects, 54 (4.2%) exhibited lacunar infarct, and 514 (40.3%) had FLD. Subjects with lacunar infarct had a higher prevalence of FLD (59.3% vs 39.4%, P =.004). There was significant interaction between obesity (BMI < 25 kg/m 2 vs ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) and FLD for lacunar infarct (P for interaction =.024). Subgroup analysis revealed that non-obese FLD was more common in the subjects with lacunar infarct than those without (51.7% vs 23.5%, P =.001). However, there was no significant difference in the obese FLD prevalence between these 2 groups. In multivariate models adjusted by age, sex, smoking, alcohol, hypertension and diabetes, FLD was significantly associated with lacunar infarct (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-3.58; P =.027). Non-obese FLD was associated with lacunar infarct (OR 3.58; 95% CI 1.63-7.89; P =.002); however, this association remained insignificant in obese FLD. Instead, ageing and hypertension were independent risk factors for lacunar infarct in the obese population. Conclusions: FLD is significantly associated with lacunar infarct, independent of traditional risk factors. This association was prominent in the non-obese population.

KW - atherosclerosis

KW - cerebral infarct

KW - hepatic steatosis

KW - lacunar infarct

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U2 - 10.1111/liv.13663

DO - 10.1111/liv.13663

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VL - 38

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JO - Liver International

JF - Liver International

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