Neural substrates predicting short-term improvement of tinnitus loudness and distress after modified tinnitus retraining therapy

Shin Hye Kim, Ji Hye Jang, Sang Yeon Lee, Jae Joon Han, Ja-Won Koo, Sven Vanneste, Dirk De Ridder, Jae Jin Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is efficacious in most patients, the exact mechanism is unclear and no predictor of improvement is available. We correlated the extent of improvement with pre-TRT quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) findings to identify neural predictors of improvement after TRT. Thirty-two patients with debilitating tinnitus were prospectively enrolled, and qEEG data were recorded before their initial TRT sessions. Three months later, these qEEG findings were correlated with the percentage improvements in the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) scores, and numeric rating scale (NRS) scores of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus perception. The THI score improvement was positively correlated with the pre-treatment activities of the left insula and the left rostral and pregenual anterior cingulate cortices (rACC/pgACC), which control parasympathetic activity. Additionally, the activities of the right auditory cortices and the parahippocampus, areas that generate tinnitus, negatively correlated with improvements in loudness. Improvements in the NRS scores of tinnitus perception correlated positively with the pre-TRT activities of the bilateral rACC/pgACC, areas suggested to form the core of the noise-canceling system. The current study supports both the classical neurophysiological and integrative models of tinnitus; our results serve as a milestone in the development of precision medicine in the context of TRT.

Original languageEnglish
Article number29140
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Jul 2016

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Tinnitus
Therapeutics
Electroencephalography
Loudness Perception
Equipment and Supplies
Precision Medicine
Auditory Cortex
Gyrus Cinguli
Noise

Cite this

Kim, Shin Hye ; Jang, Ji Hye ; Lee, Sang Yeon ; Han, Jae Joon ; Koo, Ja-Won ; Vanneste, Sven ; De Ridder, Dirk ; Song, Jae Jin. / Neural substrates predicting short-term improvement of tinnitus loudness and distress after modified tinnitus retraining therapy. In: Scientific Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.
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Neural substrates predicting short-term improvement of tinnitus loudness and distress after modified tinnitus retraining therapy. / Kim, Shin Hye; Jang, Ji Hye; Lee, Sang Yeon; Han, Jae Joon; Koo, Ja-Won; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk; Song, Jae Jin.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 29140, 06.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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