Negative-pressure wound therapy induces endothelial progenitor cell mobilization in diabetic patients with foot infection or skin defects

Sang Gyo Seo, Ji Hyun Yeo, JI Hye Kim, Ji Beom Kim, Tae Joon Cho, Dong Yeon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non healing chronic wounds are difficult to treat in patients with diabetes and can result in severe medical problems for these patients and for society. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been adopted to treat intractable chronic wounds and has been reported to be effective. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of this treatment have not been elucidated. To assess the vasculogenic effect of NPWT, we evaluated the systemic mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) during NPWT. Twenty-two of 29 consecutive patients who presented at the clinic of Seoul National Universty Hospital between December 2009 and November 2010 who underwent NPWT for diabetic foot infections or skin ulcers were included in this study. Peripheral blood samples were taken before NPWT (pre-NPWT) and 7-14 days after the initiation of NPWT (during- NPWT). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis showed that the number of cells in EPC-enriched fractions increased after NPWT, and the numbers of EPC colony forming units (CFUs) significantly increased during NPWT. We believe that NPWT is useful for treating patients with diabetic foot infections and skin ulcers, especially when these conditions are accompanied by peripheral arterial insufficiency. The systemic mobilization of EPCs during NPWT may be a mechanism for healing intractable wounds in diabetic patients with foot infections or skin defects via the formation of increased granulation tissue with numerous small blood vessels.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere62
JournalExperimental and Molecular Medicine
Volume45
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Endothelial cells
Foot
Skin
Defects
Infection
Skin Ulcer
Diabetic Foot
Medical problems
Wound Healing
Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Granulation
Granulation Tissue
Blood vessels
Sorting
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Diabetic foot
  • Endothelial progenitor cell
  • Negative-pressure wound therapy

Cite this

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abstract = "Non healing chronic wounds are difficult to treat in patients with diabetes and can result in severe medical problems for these patients and for society. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been adopted to treat intractable chronic wounds and has been reported to be effective. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of this treatment have not been elucidated. To assess the vasculogenic effect of NPWT, we evaluated the systemic mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) during NPWT. Twenty-two of 29 consecutive patients who presented at the clinic of Seoul National Universty Hospital between December 2009 and November 2010 who underwent NPWT for diabetic foot infections or skin ulcers were included in this study. Peripheral blood samples were taken before NPWT (pre-NPWT) and 7-14 days after the initiation of NPWT (during- NPWT). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis showed that the number of cells in EPC-enriched fractions increased after NPWT, and the numbers of EPC colony forming units (CFUs) significantly increased during NPWT. We believe that NPWT is useful for treating patients with diabetic foot infections and skin ulcers, especially when these conditions are accompanied by peripheral arterial insufficiency. The systemic mobilization of EPCs during NPWT may be a mechanism for healing intractable wounds in diabetic patients with foot infections or skin defects via the formation of increased granulation tissue with numerous small blood vessels.",
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Negative-pressure wound therapy induces endothelial progenitor cell mobilization in diabetic patients with foot infection or skin defects. / Seo, Sang Gyo; Yeo, Ji Hyun; Kim, JI Hye; Kim, Ji Beom; Cho, Tae Joon; Lee, Dong Yeon.

In: Experimental and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 11, e62, 11.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Seo, Sang Gyo

AU - Yeo, Ji Hyun

AU - Kim, JI Hye

AU - Kim, Ji Beom

AU - Cho, Tae Joon

AU - Lee, Dong Yeon

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