Nasal symbiont Staphylococcus epidermidis restricts the cellular entry of influenza virus into the nasal epithelium

Ara Jo, Jina Won, Chan Hee Gil, Su Keun Kim, Kang Mu Lee, Sang Sun Yoon, Hyun Jik Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Our recent study presented that human nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis could potentiate antiviral immunity in the nasal mucosa through interferon-related innate responses. Here, we found that human nasal commensal S. epidermidis promoted protease–protease inhibitor balance in favor of the host and prevented influenza A virus (IAV) replication in the nasal mucosa and lungs. A relatively higher induction of Serpine1 exhibited in S. epidermidis-inoculated nasal epithelium and S. epidermidis-induced Serpine1 significantly decreased the expression of serine proteases. Furthermore, the transcription of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and Serpine1 was biologically relevant in S. epidermidis-inoculated nasal epithelium, and the induction of uPA might be related to the sequential increase of Serpine1 in human nasal epithelium. Our findings reveal that human nasal commensal S. epidermidis manipulates the cellular environment lacking serine proteases in the nasal epithelium through Serpine1 induction and disturbs IAV spread to the lungs at the level of the nasal mucosa.

Original languageEnglish
Article number26
Journalnpj Biofilms and Microbiomes
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

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