N-terminal Ubiquitination

No Longer Such a Rare Modification

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is involved in selective targeting of innumerable cellular proteins via a complex pathway that plays important roles in a broad array of processes. An important step in the proteolytic cascade is specific recognition of the substrate by one of many ubiquitin ligases, E3s, that is followed by generation of the polyubiquitin degradation signal. For most substrates, it is believed, though it has not been shown directly, that the first ubiquitin moiety is conjugated, via its C-terminal Gly76 residue, to an e-NH2 group of an internal lysine residue. Recent findings indicate that for an increasing number of proteins, the first ubiquitin moiety is fused linearly to the a-NH2 group of the N-terminal residue. An important biological question relates to the evolutionary requirement for an alternative mode of ubiquitination.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProtein Degradation
PublisherWiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
Pages10-20
Number of pages11
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9783527318780
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Ubiquitination
Ubiquitin
Polyubiquitin
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Substrates
Ligases
Lysine
Proteins
Degradation

Keywords

  • N-terminal ubiquitination

Cite this

Ciechanover, A. (2007). N-terminal Ubiquitination: No Longer Such a Rare Modification. In Protein Degradation (Vol. 1, pp. 10-20). Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. https://doi.org/10.1002/9783527619320.ch2
Ciechanover, Aaron. / N-terminal Ubiquitination : No Longer Such a Rare Modification. Protein Degradation. Vol. 1 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2007. pp. 10-20
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Ciechanover, A 2007, N-terminal Ubiquitination: No Longer Such a Rare Modification. in Protein Degradation. vol. 1, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, pp. 10-20. https://doi.org/10.1002/9783527619320.ch2

N-terminal Ubiquitination : No Longer Such a Rare Modification. / Ciechanover, Aaron.

Protein Degradation. Vol. 1 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2007. p. 10-20.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Ciechanover A. N-terminal Ubiquitination: No Longer Such a Rare Modification. In Protein Degradation. Vol. 1. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. 2007. p. 10-20 https://doi.org/10.1002/9783527619320.ch2