MR imaging of changes of the growth plate after partial physeal removal and fat graft interposition in rabbits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. The most important complication of skeletal injuries involving the growth plate is growth disturbance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR features of growth plate modification after fat graft interposition in growth plate injury and to correlate these findings with pathological findings. METHODS. A growth plate injury model was used in 12 skeletally immature rabbits. A longitudinal drill hole 5 mm in diameter was created in the central part of the growth plate in the distal femur, bilaterally. One side was filled with autologous fat, and the contralateral defect was left empty as a control. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, and routine histological study was performed. The authors evaluated sequential changes in MR images and the histological basis of MR findings. RESULTS. In grafted femur, the signal intensity of the grafted area was lower than that of the surrounding bone on T2-weighted images at 1 month. The growth plate defect at 3 to 6 months was modified and had a proximally tapering appearance. The ratio of the growth plate defect was smaller in the grafted femur than in the control femur after surgery. Histologically, the fat-grafted area was replaced by fibrous connective tissue. In the control femur, a bony bridge was rectangular in the longitudinal direction and showed isosignal intensity with a rim of low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging. Histologically, the defect was filled with mature fatty marrow with new bone formation in the control femur. CONCLUSIONS. The proximally pointing appearance and the low signal intensity of the grafted area on MR suggested fibrous degeneration of grafted fat that prevented solid bony bridge formation in experimentally induced growth plate injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)712-720
Number of pages9
JournalInvestigative Radiology
Volume35
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2000

Fingerprint

Growth Plate
Femur
Fats
Rabbits
Transplants
Osteogenesis
Connective Tissue
Bone Marrow
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Bone and Bones
Salter-Harris Fractures
Growth

Keywords

  • Bone, MR
  • Bone, growth and development
  • Bone, injuries
  • MR, experimental study

Cite this

@article{81138627dc894adfae19e474f99703ed,
title = "MR imaging of changes of the growth plate after partial physeal removal and fat graft interposition in rabbits",
abstract = "RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. The most important complication of skeletal injuries involving the growth plate is growth disturbance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR features of growth plate modification after fat graft interposition in growth plate injury and to correlate these findings with pathological findings. METHODS. A growth plate injury model was used in 12 skeletally immature rabbits. A longitudinal drill hole 5 mm in diameter was created in the central part of the growth plate in the distal femur, bilaterally. One side was filled with autologous fat, and the contralateral defect was left empty as a control. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, and routine histological study was performed. The authors evaluated sequential changes in MR images and the histological basis of MR findings. RESULTS. In grafted femur, the signal intensity of the grafted area was lower than that of the surrounding bone on T2-weighted images at 1 month. The growth plate defect at 3 to 6 months was modified and had a proximally tapering appearance. The ratio of the growth plate defect was smaller in the grafted femur than in the control femur after surgery. Histologically, the fat-grafted area was replaced by fibrous connective tissue. In the control femur, a bony bridge was rectangular in the longitudinal direction and showed isosignal intensity with a rim of low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging. Histologically, the defect was filled with mature fatty marrow with new bone formation in the control femur. CONCLUSIONS. The proximally pointing appearance and the low signal intensity of the grafted area on MR suggested fibrous degeneration of grafted fat that prevented solid bony bridge formation in experimentally induced growth plate injury.",
keywords = "Bone, MR, Bone, growth and development, Bone, injuries, MR, experimental study",
author = "Kim, {In One} and Kim, {Hyung Jin} and Jung-Eun Cheon and Sung, {Chang Kyu} and Kim, {Chong Jai} and Kim, {Woo Sun} and Sun-Won Park and Whal Lee and Choi, {In Ho} and Yeon, {Kyung Mo}",
year = "2000",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00004424-200012000-00004",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "712--720",
journal = "Investigative radiology",
issn = "0020-9996",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Ltd.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - MR imaging of changes of the growth plate after partial physeal removal and fat graft interposition in rabbits

AU - Kim, In One

AU - Kim, Hyung Jin

AU - Cheon, Jung-Eun

AU - Sung, Chang Kyu

AU - Kim, Chong Jai

AU - Kim, Woo Sun

AU - Park, Sun-Won

AU - Lee, Whal

AU - Choi, In Ho

AU - Yeon, Kyung Mo

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. The most important complication of skeletal injuries involving the growth plate is growth disturbance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR features of growth plate modification after fat graft interposition in growth plate injury and to correlate these findings with pathological findings. METHODS. A growth plate injury model was used in 12 skeletally immature rabbits. A longitudinal drill hole 5 mm in diameter was created in the central part of the growth plate in the distal femur, bilaterally. One side was filled with autologous fat, and the contralateral defect was left empty as a control. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, and routine histological study was performed. The authors evaluated sequential changes in MR images and the histological basis of MR findings. RESULTS. In grafted femur, the signal intensity of the grafted area was lower than that of the surrounding bone on T2-weighted images at 1 month. The growth plate defect at 3 to 6 months was modified and had a proximally tapering appearance. The ratio of the growth plate defect was smaller in the grafted femur than in the control femur after surgery. Histologically, the fat-grafted area was replaced by fibrous connective tissue. In the control femur, a bony bridge was rectangular in the longitudinal direction and showed isosignal intensity with a rim of low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging. Histologically, the defect was filled with mature fatty marrow with new bone formation in the control femur. CONCLUSIONS. The proximally pointing appearance and the low signal intensity of the grafted area on MR suggested fibrous degeneration of grafted fat that prevented solid bony bridge formation in experimentally induced growth plate injury.

AB - RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES. The most important complication of skeletal injuries involving the growth plate is growth disturbance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR features of growth plate modification after fat graft interposition in growth plate injury and to correlate these findings with pathological findings. METHODS. A growth plate injury model was used in 12 skeletally immature rabbits. A longitudinal drill hole 5 mm in diameter was created in the central part of the growth plate in the distal femur, bilaterally. One side was filled with autologous fat, and the contralateral defect was left empty as a control. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, and routine histological study was performed. The authors evaluated sequential changes in MR images and the histological basis of MR findings. RESULTS. In grafted femur, the signal intensity of the grafted area was lower than that of the surrounding bone on T2-weighted images at 1 month. The growth plate defect at 3 to 6 months was modified and had a proximally tapering appearance. The ratio of the growth plate defect was smaller in the grafted femur than in the control femur after surgery. Histologically, the fat-grafted area was replaced by fibrous connective tissue. In the control femur, a bony bridge was rectangular in the longitudinal direction and showed isosignal intensity with a rim of low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging. Histologically, the defect was filled with mature fatty marrow with new bone formation in the control femur. CONCLUSIONS. The proximally pointing appearance and the low signal intensity of the grafted area on MR suggested fibrous degeneration of grafted fat that prevented solid bony bridge formation in experimentally induced growth plate injury.

KW - Bone, MR

KW - Bone, growth and development

KW - Bone, injuries

KW - MR, experimental study

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034526731&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00004424-200012000-00004

DO - 10.1097/00004424-200012000-00004

M3 - Article

C2 - 11204797

AN - SCOPUS:0034526731

VL - 35

SP - 712

EP - 720

JO - Investigative radiology

JF - Investigative radiology

SN - 0020-9996

IS - 12

ER -