Magnesium sulphate attenuates acute postoperative pain and increased pain intensity after surgical injury in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

Hyun Jeong Shin, E. Y. Kim, Hyo Seok Na, T. K. Kim, M. H. Kim, Sanghwan Do

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Abstract

Background We evaluated the effect of magnesium sulphate on increased pain in 44 patients undergoing staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods The magnesium group (n=22) and the control group (n=22) received magnesium sulphate and isotonic saline, respectively, throughout the surgery. Postoperative pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) at rest and the amounts of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA, fentanyl) and rescue analgesia (ketoprofen) administered during the first 48 h were compared between the two groups and within each group between the first and second TKA. Results The VAS scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the magnesium group not only after the first TKA [29 (11) vs 19 (9) at 24 h and 33 (8) vs 24 (10) at 48 h; P=0.001] but also after the second TKA [44 (17) vs 20 (10) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 25 (10) at 48 h; P<0.001]. In the control group, VAS scores were significantly higher for the second than for the first operated knee [44 (17) vs 29 (11) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 33 (8) at 48 h; P<0.001 and P=0.006, respectively]. In the magnesium group, there were no significant differences in VAS scores between the first and second TKA. Magnesium significantly reduced the amounts of rescue analgesics and fentanyl administered over the first 48 h postoperatively. Conclusions Magnesium sulphate administration significantly reduced postoperative pain and minimized the difference in pain intensity between the first and second operations. Clinical trial registration KCT0001361.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-503
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume117
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2016

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Magnesium Sulfate
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Intraoperative Complications
Acute Pain
Postoperative Pain
Visual Analog Scale
Magnesium
Placebos
Pain
Fentanyl
Control Groups
Ketoprofen
Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis
Analgesia
Analgesics
Knee
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • magnesium
  • pain
  • postoperative
  • total knee arthroplasty

Cite this

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title = "Magnesium sulphate attenuates acute postoperative pain and increased pain intensity after surgical injury in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial",
abstract = "Background We evaluated the effect of magnesium sulphate on increased pain in 44 patients undergoing staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods The magnesium group (n=22) and the control group (n=22) received magnesium sulphate and isotonic saline, respectively, throughout the surgery. Postoperative pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) at rest and the amounts of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA, fentanyl) and rescue analgesia (ketoprofen) administered during the first 48 h were compared between the two groups and within each group between the first and second TKA. Results The VAS scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the magnesium group not only after the first TKA [29 (11) vs 19 (9) at 24 h and 33 (8) vs 24 (10) at 48 h; P=0.001] but also after the second TKA [44 (17) vs 20 (10) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 25 (10) at 48 h; P<0.001]. In the control group, VAS scores were significantly higher for the second than for the first operated knee [44 (17) vs 29 (11) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 33 (8) at 48 h; P<0.001 and P=0.006, respectively]. In the magnesium group, there were no significant differences in VAS scores between the first and second TKA. Magnesium significantly reduced the amounts of rescue analgesics and fentanyl administered over the first 48 h postoperatively. Conclusions Magnesium sulphate administration significantly reduced postoperative pain and minimized the difference in pain intensity between the first and second operations. Clinical trial registration KCT0001361.",
keywords = "magnesium, pain, postoperative, total knee arthroplasty",
author = "Shin, {Hyun Jeong} and Kim, {E. Y.} and Na, {Hyo Seok} and Kim, {T. K.} and Kim, {M. H.} and Sanghwan Do",
year = "2016",
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T1 - Magnesium sulphate attenuates acute postoperative pain and increased pain intensity after surgical injury in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty

T2 - A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

AU - Shin, Hyun Jeong

AU - Kim, E. Y.

AU - Na, Hyo Seok

AU - Kim, T. K.

AU - Kim, M. H.

AU - Do, Sanghwan

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background We evaluated the effect of magnesium sulphate on increased pain in 44 patients undergoing staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods The magnesium group (n=22) and the control group (n=22) received magnesium sulphate and isotonic saline, respectively, throughout the surgery. Postoperative pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) at rest and the amounts of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA, fentanyl) and rescue analgesia (ketoprofen) administered during the first 48 h were compared between the two groups and within each group between the first and second TKA. Results The VAS scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the magnesium group not only after the first TKA [29 (11) vs 19 (9) at 24 h and 33 (8) vs 24 (10) at 48 h; P=0.001] but also after the second TKA [44 (17) vs 20 (10) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 25 (10) at 48 h; P<0.001]. In the control group, VAS scores were significantly higher for the second than for the first operated knee [44 (17) vs 29 (11) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 33 (8) at 48 h; P<0.001 and P=0.006, respectively]. In the magnesium group, there were no significant differences in VAS scores between the first and second TKA. Magnesium significantly reduced the amounts of rescue analgesics and fentanyl administered over the first 48 h postoperatively. Conclusions Magnesium sulphate administration significantly reduced postoperative pain and minimized the difference in pain intensity between the first and second operations. Clinical trial registration KCT0001361.

AB - Background We evaluated the effect of magnesium sulphate on increased pain in 44 patients undergoing staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods The magnesium group (n=22) and the control group (n=22) received magnesium sulphate and isotonic saline, respectively, throughout the surgery. Postoperative pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) at rest and the amounts of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA, fentanyl) and rescue analgesia (ketoprofen) administered during the first 48 h were compared between the two groups and within each group between the first and second TKA. Results The VAS scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the magnesium group not only after the first TKA [29 (11) vs 19 (9) at 24 h and 33 (8) vs 24 (10) at 48 h; P=0.001] but also after the second TKA [44 (17) vs 20 (10) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 25 (10) at 48 h; P<0.001]. In the control group, VAS scores were significantly higher for the second than for the first operated knee [44 (17) vs 29 (11) at 24 h and 43 (14) vs 33 (8) at 48 h; P<0.001 and P=0.006, respectively]. In the magnesium group, there were no significant differences in VAS scores between the first and second TKA. Magnesium significantly reduced the amounts of rescue analgesics and fentanyl administered over the first 48 h postoperatively. Conclusions Magnesium sulphate administration significantly reduced postoperative pain and minimized the difference in pain intensity between the first and second operations. Clinical trial registration KCT0001361.

KW - magnesium

KW - pain

KW - postoperative

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JO - British journal of anaesthesia

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