Low-level lead exposure and autistic behaviors in school-age children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The association between lead exposure and autism spectrum disorder is inconclusive. We hypothesized an association between higher blood lead concentrations and more autistic behaviors, including impaired social interactions and communication, stereotypical behaviors, and restricted interests, among school-age children. Methods: Data from 2473 Korean children aged 7-8 years who had no prior history of developmental disorders were analyzed. Two follow-up surveys were conducted biennially until the children reached 11-12 years of age. Blood lead concentrations were measured at every survey, and autistic behaviors were evaluated at 11-12 years of age using the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The associations of blood lead concentration with ASSQ and SRS scores were analyzed using negative binomial, logistic, and linear regression models. Results: Blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age (geometric mean: 1.64 μg/dL), but not at 9-10 and 11-12 years of age, were associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, according to the ASSQ (β = 0.151; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.061, 0.242) and SRS (β = 2.489; 95% CI: 1.378, 3.600). SRS subscale analysis also revealed associations between blood lead concentrations and social awareness, cognition, communication, motivation, and mannerisms. Conclusion: Even low blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age are associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, underscoring the need for continued efforts to reduce lead exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroToxicology
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Blood
Autistic Disorder
Screening
Linear Models
Communication
Confidence Intervals
Interpersonal Relations
Linear regression
Cognition
Logistics
Motivation
Logistic Models
Surveys and Questionnaires
Lead

Keywords

  • Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Lead
  • School age population
  • Social Responsiveness Scale

Cite this

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title = "Low-level lead exposure and autistic behaviors in school-age children",
abstract = "Introduction: The association between lead exposure and autism spectrum disorder is inconclusive. We hypothesized an association between higher blood lead concentrations and more autistic behaviors, including impaired social interactions and communication, stereotypical behaviors, and restricted interests, among school-age children. Methods: Data from 2473 Korean children aged 7-8 years who had no prior history of developmental disorders were analyzed. Two follow-up surveys were conducted biennially until the children reached 11-12 years of age. Blood lead concentrations were measured at every survey, and autistic behaviors were evaluated at 11-12 years of age using the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The associations of blood lead concentration with ASSQ and SRS scores were analyzed using negative binomial, logistic, and linear regression models. Results: Blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age (geometric mean: 1.64 μg/dL), but not at 9-10 and 11-12 years of age, were associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, according to the ASSQ (β = 0.151; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.061, 0.242) and SRS (β = 2.489; 95{\%} CI: 1.378, 3.600). SRS subscale analysis also revealed associations between blood lead concentrations and social awareness, cognition, communication, motivation, and mannerisms. Conclusion: Even low blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age are associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, underscoring the need for continued efforts to reduce lead exposure.",
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Low-level lead exposure and autistic behaviors in school-age children. / Kim, Kyoung Nam; Kwon, Ho Jang; Hong, Yun-Chul.

In: NeuroToxicology, Vol. 53, 01.03.2016, p. 193-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-level lead exposure and autistic behaviors in school-age children

AU - Kim, Kyoung Nam

AU - Kwon, Ho Jang

AU - Hong, Yun-Chul

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N2 - Introduction: The association between lead exposure and autism spectrum disorder is inconclusive. We hypothesized an association between higher blood lead concentrations and more autistic behaviors, including impaired social interactions and communication, stereotypical behaviors, and restricted interests, among school-age children. Methods: Data from 2473 Korean children aged 7-8 years who had no prior history of developmental disorders were analyzed. Two follow-up surveys were conducted biennially until the children reached 11-12 years of age. Blood lead concentrations were measured at every survey, and autistic behaviors were evaluated at 11-12 years of age using the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The associations of blood lead concentration with ASSQ and SRS scores were analyzed using negative binomial, logistic, and linear regression models. Results: Blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age (geometric mean: 1.64 μg/dL), but not at 9-10 and 11-12 years of age, were associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, according to the ASSQ (β = 0.151; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.061, 0.242) and SRS (β = 2.489; 95% CI: 1.378, 3.600). SRS subscale analysis also revealed associations between blood lead concentrations and social awareness, cognition, communication, motivation, and mannerisms. Conclusion: Even low blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age are associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, underscoring the need for continued efforts to reduce lead exposure.

AB - Introduction: The association between lead exposure and autism spectrum disorder is inconclusive. We hypothesized an association between higher blood lead concentrations and more autistic behaviors, including impaired social interactions and communication, stereotypical behaviors, and restricted interests, among school-age children. Methods: Data from 2473 Korean children aged 7-8 years who had no prior history of developmental disorders were analyzed. Two follow-up surveys were conducted biennially until the children reached 11-12 years of age. Blood lead concentrations were measured at every survey, and autistic behaviors were evaluated at 11-12 years of age using the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The associations of blood lead concentration with ASSQ and SRS scores were analyzed using negative binomial, logistic, and linear regression models. Results: Blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age (geometric mean: 1.64 μg/dL), but not at 9-10 and 11-12 years of age, were associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, according to the ASSQ (β = 0.151; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.061, 0.242) and SRS (β = 2.489; 95% CI: 1.378, 3.600). SRS subscale analysis also revealed associations between blood lead concentrations and social awareness, cognition, communication, motivation, and mannerisms. Conclusion: Even low blood lead concentrations at 7-8 years of age are associated with more autistic behaviors at 11-12 years of age, underscoring the need for continued efforts to reduce lead exposure.

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