Kidney regeneration with biomimetic vascular scaffolds based on vascular corrosion casts

Jennifer Huling, Sang Il Min, Doo Sang Kim, In Kap Ko, Anthony Atala, James J. Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We have developed a biomimetic renal vascular scaffold based on a vascular corrosion casting technique. This study evaluated the feasibility of using this novel biomimetic scaffold for kidney regeneration in a rat kidney cortical defect model. Vascular corrosion casts were prepared from normal rat kidneys by perfusion with 10% polycaprolactone (PCL) solution, followed by tissue digestion. The corrosion PCL cast was coated with collagen, and PCL was removed from within the collagen coating, leaving only a hollow collagen-based biomimetic vascular scaffold. The fabricated scaffolds were pre-vascularized with MS1 endothelial cell coating, incorporated into 3D renal constructs, and subsequently implanted either with or without human renal cells in the renal cortex of nude rats. The implanted collagen-based vascular scaffold was easily identified and integrated into native kidney tissue. The biomimetic vascular scaffold coated with endothelial cells (MS1) showed significantly enhanced vascularization, as compared to the uncoated scaffold and hydrogel only groups (P < 0.001). Along with the improved vascularization effects, the MS1-coated scaffolds showeda significant renal cell infiltration from the neighboring host tissue, as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, addition of human renal cells to the MS1-coated scaffold resulted in further enhancement of vascularization and tubular structure regeneration within the implanted constructs. The biomimetic collagen vascular scaffolds coated with endothelial cells are able to enhance vascularization and facilitate the formation of renal tubules after 14 days when combined with human renal cells. This study shows the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration. Statement of Significance: Vascularization is one of the major hurdles affecting the survival and integration of implanted three-dimensional tissue constructs in vivo. A novel, biomimetic, collagen-based vascular scaffold that is structurally identical to native kidney tissue was developed and tested. This biomimetic vascularized scaffold system facilitates the development of new vessels and renal cell viability in vivo when implanted in a partial renal defect. The use of this scaffold system could address the challenges associated with vascularization, and may be an ideal treatment strategy for partial augmentation of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-336
Number of pages9
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Biomimetics
Corrosion
Scaffolds (biology)
Blood Vessels
Regeneration
Kidney
Collagen
Scaffolds
Tissue
Polycaprolactone
Endothelial cells
Rats
Coatings
Defects
Hydrogel
Endothelial Cells
Infiltration
Feasibility Studies
Hydrogels
Casting

Keywords

  • Kidney
  • Regeneration
  • Tissue engineering
  • Tissue scaffolds

Cite this

Huling, Jennifer ; Min, Sang Il ; Kim, Doo Sang ; Ko, In Kap ; Atala, Anthony ; Yoo, James J. / Kidney regeneration with biomimetic vascular scaffolds based on vascular corrosion casts. In: Acta Biomaterialia. 2019 ; Vol. 95. pp. 328-336.
@article{479a9ef58b0a436486d7f2dcd03348d7,
title = "Kidney regeneration with biomimetic vascular scaffolds based on vascular corrosion casts",
abstract = "We have developed a biomimetic renal vascular scaffold based on a vascular corrosion casting technique. This study evaluated the feasibility of using this novel biomimetic scaffold for kidney regeneration in a rat kidney cortical defect model. Vascular corrosion casts were prepared from normal rat kidneys by perfusion with 10{\%} polycaprolactone (PCL) solution, followed by tissue digestion. The corrosion PCL cast was coated with collagen, and PCL was removed from within the collagen coating, leaving only a hollow collagen-based biomimetic vascular scaffold. The fabricated scaffolds were pre-vascularized with MS1 endothelial cell coating, incorporated into 3D renal constructs, and subsequently implanted either with or without human renal cells in the renal cortex of nude rats. The implanted collagen-based vascular scaffold was easily identified and integrated into native kidney tissue. The biomimetic vascular scaffold coated with endothelial cells (MS1) showed significantly enhanced vascularization, as compared to the uncoated scaffold and hydrogel only groups (P < 0.001). Along with the improved vascularization effects, the MS1-coated scaffolds showeda significant renal cell infiltration from the neighboring host tissue, as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, addition of human renal cells to the MS1-coated scaffold resulted in further enhancement of vascularization and tubular structure regeneration within the implanted constructs. The biomimetic collagen vascular scaffolds coated with endothelial cells are able to enhance vascularization and facilitate the formation of renal tubules after 14 days when combined with human renal cells. This study shows the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration. Statement of Significance: Vascularization is one of the major hurdles affecting the survival and integration of implanted three-dimensional tissue constructs in vivo. A novel, biomimetic, collagen-based vascular scaffold that is structurally identical to native kidney tissue was developed and tested. This biomimetic vascularized scaffold system facilitates the development of new vessels and renal cell viability in vivo when implanted in a partial renal defect. The use of this scaffold system could address the challenges associated with vascularization, and may be an ideal treatment strategy for partial augmentation of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.",
keywords = "Kidney, Regeneration, Tissue engineering, Tissue scaffolds",
author = "Jennifer Huling and Min, {Sang Il} and Kim, {Doo Sang} and Ko, {In Kap} and Anthony Atala and Yoo, {James J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.actbio.2019.04.001",
language = "English",
volume = "95",
pages = "328--336",
journal = "Acta Biomaterialia",
issn = "1742-7061",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Kidney regeneration with biomimetic vascular scaffolds based on vascular corrosion casts. / Huling, Jennifer; Min, Sang Il; Kim, Doo Sang; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 95, 01.09.2019, p. 328-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Kidney regeneration with biomimetic vascular scaffolds based on vascular corrosion casts

AU - Huling, Jennifer

AU - Min, Sang Il

AU - Kim, Doo Sang

AU - Ko, In Kap

AU - Atala, Anthony

AU - Yoo, James J.

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - We have developed a biomimetic renal vascular scaffold based on a vascular corrosion casting technique. This study evaluated the feasibility of using this novel biomimetic scaffold for kidney regeneration in a rat kidney cortical defect model. Vascular corrosion casts were prepared from normal rat kidneys by perfusion with 10% polycaprolactone (PCL) solution, followed by tissue digestion. The corrosion PCL cast was coated with collagen, and PCL was removed from within the collagen coating, leaving only a hollow collagen-based biomimetic vascular scaffold. The fabricated scaffolds were pre-vascularized with MS1 endothelial cell coating, incorporated into 3D renal constructs, and subsequently implanted either with or without human renal cells in the renal cortex of nude rats. The implanted collagen-based vascular scaffold was easily identified and integrated into native kidney tissue. The biomimetic vascular scaffold coated with endothelial cells (MS1) showed significantly enhanced vascularization, as compared to the uncoated scaffold and hydrogel only groups (P < 0.001). Along with the improved vascularization effects, the MS1-coated scaffolds showeda significant renal cell infiltration from the neighboring host tissue, as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, addition of human renal cells to the MS1-coated scaffold resulted in further enhancement of vascularization and tubular structure regeneration within the implanted constructs. The biomimetic collagen vascular scaffolds coated with endothelial cells are able to enhance vascularization and facilitate the formation of renal tubules after 14 days when combined with human renal cells. This study shows the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration. Statement of Significance: Vascularization is one of the major hurdles affecting the survival and integration of implanted three-dimensional tissue constructs in vivo. A novel, biomimetic, collagen-based vascular scaffold that is structurally identical to native kidney tissue was developed and tested. This biomimetic vascularized scaffold system facilitates the development of new vessels and renal cell viability in vivo when implanted in a partial renal defect. The use of this scaffold system could address the challenges associated with vascularization, and may be an ideal treatment strategy for partial augmentation of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

AB - We have developed a biomimetic renal vascular scaffold based on a vascular corrosion casting technique. This study evaluated the feasibility of using this novel biomimetic scaffold for kidney regeneration in a rat kidney cortical defect model. Vascular corrosion casts were prepared from normal rat kidneys by perfusion with 10% polycaprolactone (PCL) solution, followed by tissue digestion. The corrosion PCL cast was coated with collagen, and PCL was removed from within the collagen coating, leaving only a hollow collagen-based biomimetic vascular scaffold. The fabricated scaffolds were pre-vascularized with MS1 endothelial cell coating, incorporated into 3D renal constructs, and subsequently implanted either with or without human renal cells in the renal cortex of nude rats. The implanted collagen-based vascular scaffold was easily identified and integrated into native kidney tissue. The biomimetic vascular scaffold coated with endothelial cells (MS1) showed significantly enhanced vascularization, as compared to the uncoated scaffold and hydrogel only groups (P < 0.001). Along with the improved vascularization effects, the MS1-coated scaffolds showeda significant renal cell infiltration from the neighboring host tissue, as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, addition of human renal cells to the MS1-coated scaffold resulted in further enhancement of vascularization and tubular structure regeneration within the implanted constructs. The biomimetic collagen vascular scaffolds coated with endothelial cells are able to enhance vascularization and facilitate the formation of renal tubules after 14 days when combined with human renal cells. This study shows the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration. Statement of Significance: Vascularization is one of the major hurdles affecting the survival and integration of implanted three-dimensional tissue constructs in vivo. A novel, biomimetic, collagen-based vascular scaffold that is structurally identical to native kidney tissue was developed and tested. This biomimetic vascularized scaffold system facilitates the development of new vessels and renal cell viability in vivo when implanted in a partial renal defect. The use of this scaffold system could address the challenges associated with vascularization, and may be an ideal treatment strategy for partial augmentation of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

KW - Kidney

KW - Regeneration

KW - Tissue engineering

KW - Tissue scaffolds

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063914699&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.actbio.2019.04.001

DO - 10.1016/j.actbio.2019.04.001

M3 - Article

VL - 95

SP - 328

EP - 336

JO - Acta Biomaterialia

JF - Acta Biomaterialia

SN - 1742-7061

ER -