Is there a role for magnetic resonance imaging in renal trauma?

Ja Hyeon Ku, Youn Soo Jeon, Min Eui Kim, Nam Kyu Lee, Young Ho Park Urology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Computed tomography (CT) has been the most informative imaging method in renal trauma. Despite the good sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the presence of hematoma, edema and ischemia, MRI has not been widely studied in patients with renal trauma. The present study was initiated to evaluate the role of MRI in patients with renal trauma. Methods: Between June 1998 and September 1999, CT and MRI were prospectively performed on 12 patients who suffered from renal trauma and the results reviewed. Results: The presence and size of perirenal hematoma could be detected by both CT and MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging could differentiate intrarenal hematoma from perirenal hematoma more accurately, and provided additional information about the hematoma as T1- and T2-weighted MRI were able to determine recent bleeding in the hematoma by regional differences in signal intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed renal fracture with non-viable fragment and detected focal renal laceration that was not detected on CT due to perirenal hematoma associated with renal infarction. However, although MRI had many advantages over CT, it had also major drawbacks, which were that it required longer imaging time and increased the cost. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in renal trauma. However, it is suggested that MRI should be limited to carefully selected patients, such as those with severe renal injury or equivocal findings on CT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-267
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Urology
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Sep 2001

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Kidney
Hematoma
Wounds and Injuries
Tomography
Lacerations
Infarction
Edema
Ischemia
Hemorrhage
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Renal trauma

Cite this

Ku, Ja Hyeon ; Jeon, Youn Soo ; Kim, Min Eui ; Lee, Nam Kyu ; Urology, Young Ho Park. / Is there a role for magnetic resonance imaging in renal trauma?. In: International Journal of Urology. 2001 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 261-267.
@article{dd9936c98ab0475785677f6eb7ee1904,
title = "Is there a role for magnetic resonance imaging in renal trauma?",
abstract = "Background: Computed tomography (CT) has been the most informative imaging method in renal trauma. Despite the good sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the presence of hematoma, edema and ischemia, MRI has not been widely studied in patients with renal trauma. The present study was initiated to evaluate the role of MRI in patients with renal trauma. Methods: Between June 1998 and September 1999, CT and MRI were prospectively performed on 12 patients who suffered from renal trauma and the results reviewed. Results: The presence and size of perirenal hematoma could be detected by both CT and MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging could differentiate intrarenal hematoma from perirenal hematoma more accurately, and provided additional information about the hematoma as T1- and T2-weighted MRI were able to determine recent bleeding in the hematoma by regional differences in signal intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed renal fracture with non-viable fragment and detected focal renal laceration that was not detected on CT due to perirenal hematoma associated with renal infarction. However, although MRI had many advantages over CT, it had also major drawbacks, which were that it required longer imaging time and increased the cost. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in renal trauma. However, it is suggested that MRI should be limited to carefully selected patients, such as those with severe renal injury or equivocal findings on CT.",
keywords = "Computed tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Renal trauma",
author = "Ku, {Ja Hyeon} and Jeon, {Youn Soo} and Kim, {Min Eui} and Lee, {Nam Kyu} and Urology, {Young Ho Park}",
year = "2001",
month = "9",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1046/j.1442-2042.2001.00297.x",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "261--267",
journal = "International Journal of Urology",
issn = "0919-8172",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "6",

}

Is there a role for magnetic resonance imaging in renal trauma? / Ku, Ja Hyeon; Jeon, Youn Soo; Kim, Min Eui; Lee, Nam Kyu; Urology, Young Ho Park.

In: International Journal of Urology, Vol. 8, No. 6, 17.09.2001, p. 261-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is there a role for magnetic resonance imaging in renal trauma?

AU - Ku, Ja Hyeon

AU - Jeon, Youn Soo

AU - Kim, Min Eui

AU - Lee, Nam Kyu

AU - Urology, Young Ho Park

PY - 2001/9/17

Y1 - 2001/9/17

N2 - Background: Computed tomography (CT) has been the most informative imaging method in renal trauma. Despite the good sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the presence of hematoma, edema and ischemia, MRI has not been widely studied in patients with renal trauma. The present study was initiated to evaluate the role of MRI in patients with renal trauma. Methods: Between June 1998 and September 1999, CT and MRI were prospectively performed on 12 patients who suffered from renal trauma and the results reviewed. Results: The presence and size of perirenal hematoma could be detected by both CT and MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging could differentiate intrarenal hematoma from perirenal hematoma more accurately, and provided additional information about the hematoma as T1- and T2-weighted MRI were able to determine recent bleeding in the hematoma by regional differences in signal intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed renal fracture with non-viable fragment and detected focal renal laceration that was not detected on CT due to perirenal hematoma associated with renal infarction. However, although MRI had many advantages over CT, it had also major drawbacks, which were that it required longer imaging time and increased the cost. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in renal trauma. However, it is suggested that MRI should be limited to carefully selected patients, such as those with severe renal injury or equivocal findings on CT.

AB - Background: Computed tomography (CT) has been the most informative imaging method in renal trauma. Despite the good sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the presence of hematoma, edema and ischemia, MRI has not been widely studied in patients with renal trauma. The present study was initiated to evaluate the role of MRI in patients with renal trauma. Methods: Between June 1998 and September 1999, CT and MRI were prospectively performed on 12 patients who suffered from renal trauma and the results reviewed. Results: The presence and size of perirenal hematoma could be detected by both CT and MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging could differentiate intrarenal hematoma from perirenal hematoma more accurately, and provided additional information about the hematoma as T1- and T2-weighted MRI were able to determine recent bleeding in the hematoma by regional differences in signal intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed renal fracture with non-viable fragment and detected focal renal laceration that was not detected on CT due to perirenal hematoma associated with renal infarction. However, although MRI had many advantages over CT, it had also major drawbacks, which were that it required longer imaging time and increased the cost. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in renal trauma. However, it is suggested that MRI should be limited to carefully selected patients, such as those with severe renal injury or equivocal findings on CT.

KW - Computed tomography

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Renal trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034839410&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1442-2042.2001.00297.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1442-2042.2001.00297.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 11389740

AN - SCOPUS:0034839410

VL - 8

SP - 261

EP - 267

JO - International Journal of Urology

JF - International Journal of Urology

SN - 0919-8172

IS - 6

ER -