Involvement of the Internal Auditory Canal in Subjects With Cochlear Otosclerosis

A Less Acknowledged Third Window That Affects Surgical Outcome

Ye Ji Shim, Youn Jung Bae, Gwang Seok An, Kyogu Lee, Yoonjoong Kim, Sang Youp Lee, Byung Yun Choi, Byung Se Choi, Jae Hyoung Kim, Ja-Won Koo, Jae Jin Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of cavitating lesions involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) in subjects with cochlear otosclerosis with regard to poststapedotomy hearing outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A retrospective chart review of 134 subjects with otosclerosis treated from January 2011 to June 2017 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital was conducted. Sixteen subjects (23 ears) with temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT)-confirmed cochlear otosclerosis who underwent stapedotomy were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pure tone audiometry (PTA) (i.e., air and bone conduction; AC and BC, respectively) thresholds and air-bone gap (ABG), measured at 6 months postoperatively were compared between cochlear otosclerosis with and without IAC involvement (IAC group and non-IAC group, respectively). RESULTS: A total of 14 of 23 ears showed involvement of the IAC. There were no significant differences in age, side of otosclerosis, or preoperative hearing threshold between the two groups. The mean postoperative AC and BC thresholds and ABG of the IAC group were significantly poorer (45.7 dB, 33.8 dB, and 11.8 dB, respectively) than those of the nonIAC group (24.1 dB, 20.0 dB, and 4.1 dB, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cochlear otosclerosis with cavitating lesions involving the IAC showed significantly poorer postoperative audiological outcomes than those without any cavitating lesion. Cavitation extending to the IAC may act as a third window providing a route for sound energy shunting, and thus precluding successful hearing outcome in some subjects with cavitating otosclerosis after stapedotomy.

Fingerprint

Otosclerosis
Cochlea
Hearing
Air
Ear
Bone Conduction
Pure-Tone Audiometry
Bone and Bones
Temporal Bone
Tertiary Care Centers
Retrospective Studies
Tomography

Cite this

@article{c8add0ef6d9749c59d523764204854b5,
title = "Involvement of the Internal Auditory Canal in Subjects With Cochlear Otosclerosis: A Less Acknowledged Third Window That Affects Surgical Outcome",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of cavitating lesions involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) in subjects with cochlear otosclerosis with regard to poststapedotomy hearing outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A retrospective chart review of 134 subjects with otosclerosis treated from January 2011 to June 2017 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital was conducted. Sixteen subjects (23 ears) with temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT)-confirmed cochlear otosclerosis who underwent stapedotomy were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pure tone audiometry (PTA) (i.e., air and bone conduction; AC and BC, respectively) thresholds and air-bone gap (ABG), measured at 6 months postoperatively were compared between cochlear otosclerosis with and without IAC involvement (IAC group and non-IAC group, respectively). RESULTS: A total of 14 of 23 ears showed involvement of the IAC. There were no significant differences in age, side of otosclerosis, or preoperative hearing threshold between the two groups. The mean postoperative AC and BC thresholds and ABG of the IAC group were significantly poorer (45.7 dB, 33.8 dB, and 11.8 dB, respectively) than those of the nonIAC group (24.1 dB, 20.0 dB, and 4.1 dB, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cochlear otosclerosis with cavitating lesions involving the IAC showed significantly poorer postoperative audiological outcomes than those without any cavitating lesion. Cavitation extending to the IAC may act as a third window providing a route for sound energy shunting, and thus precluding successful hearing outcome in some subjects with cavitating otosclerosis after stapedotomy.",
author = "Shim, {Ye Ji} and Bae, {Youn Jung} and An, {Gwang Seok} and Kyogu Lee and Yoonjoong Kim and Lee, {Sang Youp} and Choi, {Byung Yun} and Choi, {Byung Se} and Kim, {Jae Hyoung} and Ja-Won Koo and Song, {Jae Jin}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/MAO.0000000000002144",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "e186--e190",
journal = "Otology and Neurotology",
issn = "1531-7129",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Involvement of the Internal Auditory Canal in Subjects With Cochlear Otosclerosis

T2 - A Less Acknowledged Third Window That Affects Surgical Outcome

AU - Shim, Ye Ji

AU - Bae, Youn Jung

AU - An, Gwang Seok

AU - Lee, Kyogu

AU - Kim, Yoonjoong

AU - Lee, Sang Youp

AU - Choi, Byung Yun

AU - Choi, Byung Se

AU - Kim, Jae Hyoung

AU - Koo, Ja-Won

AU - Song, Jae Jin

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of cavitating lesions involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) in subjects with cochlear otosclerosis with regard to poststapedotomy hearing outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A retrospective chart review of 134 subjects with otosclerosis treated from January 2011 to June 2017 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital was conducted. Sixteen subjects (23 ears) with temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT)-confirmed cochlear otosclerosis who underwent stapedotomy were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pure tone audiometry (PTA) (i.e., air and bone conduction; AC and BC, respectively) thresholds and air-bone gap (ABG), measured at 6 months postoperatively were compared between cochlear otosclerosis with and without IAC involvement (IAC group and non-IAC group, respectively). RESULTS: A total of 14 of 23 ears showed involvement of the IAC. There were no significant differences in age, side of otosclerosis, or preoperative hearing threshold between the two groups. The mean postoperative AC and BC thresholds and ABG of the IAC group were significantly poorer (45.7 dB, 33.8 dB, and 11.8 dB, respectively) than those of the nonIAC group (24.1 dB, 20.0 dB, and 4.1 dB, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cochlear otosclerosis with cavitating lesions involving the IAC showed significantly poorer postoperative audiological outcomes than those without any cavitating lesion. Cavitation extending to the IAC may act as a third window providing a route for sound energy shunting, and thus precluding successful hearing outcome in some subjects with cavitating otosclerosis after stapedotomy.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of cavitating lesions involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) in subjects with cochlear otosclerosis with regard to poststapedotomy hearing outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A retrospective chart review of 134 subjects with otosclerosis treated from January 2011 to June 2017 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital was conducted. Sixteen subjects (23 ears) with temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT)-confirmed cochlear otosclerosis who underwent stapedotomy were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pure tone audiometry (PTA) (i.e., air and bone conduction; AC and BC, respectively) thresholds and air-bone gap (ABG), measured at 6 months postoperatively were compared between cochlear otosclerosis with and without IAC involvement (IAC group and non-IAC group, respectively). RESULTS: A total of 14 of 23 ears showed involvement of the IAC. There were no significant differences in age, side of otosclerosis, or preoperative hearing threshold between the two groups. The mean postoperative AC and BC thresholds and ABG of the IAC group were significantly poorer (45.7 dB, 33.8 dB, and 11.8 dB, respectively) than those of the nonIAC group (24.1 dB, 20.0 dB, and 4.1 dB, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cochlear otosclerosis with cavitating lesions involving the IAC showed significantly poorer postoperative audiological outcomes than those without any cavitating lesion. Cavitation extending to the IAC may act as a third window providing a route for sound energy shunting, and thus precluding successful hearing outcome in some subjects with cavitating otosclerosis after stapedotomy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061225049&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002144

DO - 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002144

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - e186-e190

JO - Otology and Neurotology

JF - Otology and Neurotology

SN - 1531-7129

IS - 3

ER -