International Comparison of Poststroke Resource Use

A Longitudinal Analysis in Europe

David B. Matchar, Marcel Bilger, Young Kyung Do, Kirsten Eom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Long-term costs often represent a large proportion of the total costs induced by stroke, but data on long-term poststroke resource use are sparse, especially regarding the trajectory of costs by severity. We used a multinational longitudinal survey to estimate patterns of poststroke resource use by degree of functional disability and to compare resource use between regions. Methods The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multinational database of adults 50 years and older, which includes demographic information about respondents, age when stroke first occurred, current activity of daily living (ADL) limitations, and health care resource use in the year before interview. We modeled resource use with a 2-part regression for number of hospital days, home nursing hours, and paid and unpaid home caregiving hours. Results After accounting for time since stroke, number of strokes and comorbidities, age, gender, and European regions, we found that poststroke resource use was strongly associated with ADL limitations. The duration since the stroke event was significantly associated only with inpatient care, and informal help showed significant regional heterogeneity across all ADL limitation levels. Conclusions Poststroke physical deficits appear to be a strong driver of long-term resource utilization; treatments that decrease such deficits offer substantial potential for downline cost savings. Analyzing internationally comparable panel data, such as SHARE, provide valuable insight into long-term cost of stroke. More comprehensive international comparisons will require registries with follow-up, particularly for informal and formal home-based care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2256-2262
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2015

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Stroke
Activities of Daily Living
Costs and Cost Analysis
Retirement
Health Surveys
Home Nursing
Cost Savings
Health Resources
Home Care Services
Longitudinal Studies
Registries
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Patient Care
Demography
Databases
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • 2-part model
  • Poststroke resource utilization
  • SHARE
  • long-term care services
  • regional heterogeneity
  • stroke registry

Cite this

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title = "International Comparison of Poststroke Resource Use: A Longitudinal Analysis in Europe",
abstract = "Background Long-term costs often represent a large proportion of the total costs induced by stroke, but data on long-term poststroke resource use are sparse, especially regarding the trajectory of costs by severity. We used a multinational longitudinal survey to estimate patterns of poststroke resource use by degree of functional disability and to compare resource use between regions. Methods The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multinational database of adults 50 years and older, which includes demographic information about respondents, age when stroke first occurred, current activity of daily living (ADL) limitations, and health care resource use in the year before interview. We modeled resource use with a 2-part regression for number of hospital days, home nursing hours, and paid and unpaid home caregiving hours. Results After accounting for time since stroke, number of strokes and comorbidities, age, gender, and European regions, we found that poststroke resource use was strongly associated with ADL limitations. The duration since the stroke event was significantly associated only with inpatient care, and informal help showed significant regional heterogeneity across all ADL limitation levels. Conclusions Poststroke physical deficits appear to be a strong driver of long-term resource utilization; treatments that decrease such deficits offer substantial potential for downline cost savings. Analyzing internationally comparable panel data, such as SHARE, provide valuable insight into long-term cost of stroke. More comprehensive international comparisons will require registries with follow-up, particularly for informal and formal home-based care.",
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International Comparison of Poststroke Resource Use : A Longitudinal Analysis in Europe. / Matchar, David B.; Bilger, Marcel; Do, Young Kyung; Eom, Kirsten.

In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 24, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 2256-2262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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T2 - A Longitudinal Analysis in Europe

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AU - Bilger, Marcel

AU - Do, Young Kyung

AU - Eom, Kirsten

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N2 - Background Long-term costs often represent a large proportion of the total costs induced by stroke, but data on long-term poststroke resource use are sparse, especially regarding the trajectory of costs by severity. We used a multinational longitudinal survey to estimate patterns of poststroke resource use by degree of functional disability and to compare resource use between regions. Methods The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multinational database of adults 50 years and older, which includes demographic information about respondents, age when stroke first occurred, current activity of daily living (ADL) limitations, and health care resource use in the year before interview. We modeled resource use with a 2-part regression for number of hospital days, home nursing hours, and paid and unpaid home caregiving hours. Results After accounting for time since stroke, number of strokes and comorbidities, age, gender, and European regions, we found that poststroke resource use was strongly associated with ADL limitations. The duration since the stroke event was significantly associated only with inpatient care, and informal help showed significant regional heterogeneity across all ADL limitation levels. Conclusions Poststroke physical deficits appear to be a strong driver of long-term resource utilization; treatments that decrease such deficits offer substantial potential for downline cost savings. Analyzing internationally comparable panel data, such as SHARE, provide valuable insight into long-term cost of stroke. More comprehensive international comparisons will require registries with follow-up, particularly for informal and formal home-based care.

AB - Background Long-term costs often represent a large proportion of the total costs induced by stroke, but data on long-term poststroke resource use are sparse, especially regarding the trajectory of costs by severity. We used a multinational longitudinal survey to estimate patterns of poststroke resource use by degree of functional disability and to compare resource use between regions. Methods The Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is a multinational database of adults 50 years and older, which includes demographic information about respondents, age when stroke first occurred, current activity of daily living (ADL) limitations, and health care resource use in the year before interview. We modeled resource use with a 2-part regression for number of hospital days, home nursing hours, and paid and unpaid home caregiving hours. Results After accounting for time since stroke, number of strokes and comorbidities, age, gender, and European regions, we found that poststroke resource use was strongly associated with ADL limitations. The duration since the stroke event was significantly associated only with inpatient care, and informal help showed significant regional heterogeneity across all ADL limitation levels. Conclusions Poststroke physical deficits appear to be a strong driver of long-term resource utilization; treatments that decrease such deficits offer substantial potential for downline cost savings. Analyzing internationally comparable panel data, such as SHARE, provide valuable insight into long-term cost of stroke. More comprehensive international comparisons will require registries with follow-up, particularly for informal and formal home-based care.

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