Insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise on adiponectin and retinol-binding protein-4 concentrations in young and middle-aged women

Soo Lim, Hee Choi Sung, In Kyong Jeong, Hyeon Kim Jae, Kyong Moon Min, Soo Park Kyong, Kyu Lee Hong, Young Bum Kim, Chul Jang Hak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Exercise training enhances insulin sensitivity. Changes in retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and adiponectin levels are linked to insulin resistance. Objective: We tested whether the insulin-sensitizing effect of exercise is associated with age-related changes in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels in women. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: We studied 36 healthy young (22.4 ± 2.8 yr) and 38 middle-aged (59.8 ± 5.9 yr) women. All subjects performed 60 min of aerobic exercise three times per week for 10 wk at about 70% maximal exercise capacity. Results: After a 10-wk training program, maximal exercise capacity was significantly increased in both young and middle-aged women, suggesting increased oxidative capacity. Insulin sensitivity was also improved, as indicated by decreases in plasma insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index. Serum adiponectin and RBP4 concentrations were increased and decreased more in older than younger women, respectively (P < 0.01). Concurrently, circulating transthyretin levels were also decreased in older subjects in response to exercise training. The older women showed higher correlations between changes in adiponectin or RBP4 levels and obesity indices or metabolic parameters than the younger group. When subjects showing increasing adiponectin or decreasing RBP4 levels were classified as responders, there were higher correlations between these changes in responders than in nonresponders. Conclusions: We conclude that the mechanism for the insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise could involve increased adiponectin and reduced RBP4 levels in exercise-trained women. These data suggest that alterations in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels could play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2263-2268
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

Retinol-Binding Proteins
Adiponectin
Exercise
Insulin
Insulin Resistance
Prealbumin
Homeostasis
Obesity
Plasmas
Education

Cite this

@article{82801ec048194aa3a4f873fa0b4d57be,
title = "Insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise on adiponectin and retinol-binding protein-4 concentrations in young and middle-aged women",
abstract = "Context: Exercise training enhances insulin sensitivity. Changes in retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and adiponectin levels are linked to insulin resistance. Objective: We tested whether the insulin-sensitizing effect of exercise is associated with age-related changes in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels in women. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: We studied 36 healthy young (22.4 ± 2.8 yr) and 38 middle-aged (59.8 ± 5.9 yr) women. All subjects performed 60 min of aerobic exercise three times per week for 10 wk at about 70{\%} maximal exercise capacity. Results: After a 10-wk training program, maximal exercise capacity was significantly increased in both young and middle-aged women, suggesting increased oxidative capacity. Insulin sensitivity was also improved, as indicated by decreases in plasma insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index. Serum adiponectin and RBP4 concentrations were increased and decreased more in older than younger women, respectively (P < 0.01). Concurrently, circulating transthyretin levels were also decreased in older subjects in response to exercise training. The older women showed higher correlations between changes in adiponectin or RBP4 levels and obesity indices or metabolic parameters than the younger group. When subjects showing increasing adiponectin or decreasing RBP4 levels were classified as responders, there were higher correlations between these changes in responders than in nonresponders. Conclusions: We conclude that the mechanism for the insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise could involve increased adiponectin and reduced RBP4 levels in exercise-trained women. These data suggest that alterations in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels could play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity.",
author = "Soo Lim and Sung, {Hee Choi} and Jeong, {In Kyong} and Jae, {Hyeon Kim} and Min, {Kyong Moon} and Kyong, {Soo Park} and Hong, {Kyu Lee} and Kim, {Young Bum} and Hak, {Chul Jang}",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2007-2028",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "2263--2268",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise on adiponectin and retinol-binding protein-4 concentrations in young and middle-aged women

AU - Lim, Soo

AU - Sung, Hee Choi

AU - Jeong, In Kyong

AU - Jae, Hyeon Kim

AU - Min, Kyong Moon

AU - Kyong, Soo Park

AU - Hong, Kyu Lee

AU - Kim, Young Bum

AU - Hak, Chul Jang

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - Context: Exercise training enhances insulin sensitivity. Changes in retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and adiponectin levels are linked to insulin resistance. Objective: We tested whether the insulin-sensitizing effect of exercise is associated with age-related changes in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels in women. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: We studied 36 healthy young (22.4 ± 2.8 yr) and 38 middle-aged (59.8 ± 5.9 yr) women. All subjects performed 60 min of aerobic exercise three times per week for 10 wk at about 70% maximal exercise capacity. Results: After a 10-wk training program, maximal exercise capacity was significantly increased in both young and middle-aged women, suggesting increased oxidative capacity. Insulin sensitivity was also improved, as indicated by decreases in plasma insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index. Serum adiponectin and RBP4 concentrations were increased and decreased more in older than younger women, respectively (P < 0.01). Concurrently, circulating transthyretin levels were also decreased in older subjects in response to exercise training. The older women showed higher correlations between changes in adiponectin or RBP4 levels and obesity indices or metabolic parameters than the younger group. When subjects showing increasing adiponectin or decreasing RBP4 levels were classified as responders, there were higher correlations between these changes in responders than in nonresponders. Conclusions: We conclude that the mechanism for the insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise could involve increased adiponectin and reduced RBP4 levels in exercise-trained women. These data suggest that alterations in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels could play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity.

AB - Context: Exercise training enhances insulin sensitivity. Changes in retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and adiponectin levels are linked to insulin resistance. Objective: We tested whether the insulin-sensitizing effect of exercise is associated with age-related changes in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels in women. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: We studied 36 healthy young (22.4 ± 2.8 yr) and 38 middle-aged (59.8 ± 5.9 yr) women. All subjects performed 60 min of aerobic exercise three times per week for 10 wk at about 70% maximal exercise capacity. Results: After a 10-wk training program, maximal exercise capacity was significantly increased in both young and middle-aged women, suggesting increased oxidative capacity. Insulin sensitivity was also improved, as indicated by decreases in plasma insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index. Serum adiponectin and RBP4 concentrations were increased and decreased more in older than younger women, respectively (P < 0.01). Concurrently, circulating transthyretin levels were also decreased in older subjects in response to exercise training. The older women showed higher correlations between changes in adiponectin or RBP4 levels and obesity indices or metabolic parameters than the younger group. When subjects showing increasing adiponectin or decreasing RBP4 levels were classified as responders, there were higher correlations between these changes in responders than in nonresponders. Conclusions: We conclude that the mechanism for the insulin-sensitizing effects of exercise could involve increased adiponectin and reduced RBP4 levels in exercise-trained women. These data suggest that alterations in circulating RBP4 and adiponectin levels could play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=45149097354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2007-2028

DO - 10.1210/jc.2007-2028

M3 - Article

C2 - 18334592

AN - SCOPUS:45149097354

VL - 93

SP - 2263

EP - 2268

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 6

ER -