Influence of a modified propofol equilibration rate constant (k e0) on the effect-site concentration at loss and recovery of consciousness with the Marsh model

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Abstract

Summary This study compared the predicted effect-site concentration of propofol at loss and recovery of consciousness when using target-controlled infusion devices with the same pharmacokinetic model (Marsh) but a different plasma effect-site equilibration rate constant (ke0), the DiprifusorTM (ke0 0.26 min-1) and Base Primea™ (ke0 1.21 min-1). We studied 60 female patients undergoing minor gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia. Although the total dose of propofol and time until loss of consciousness were comparable, the effect-site concentration at loss of consciousness was significantly lower with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.2 (0.3) μg.ml-1 vs 4.5 (0.9) μg.ml-1, respectively, p < 0.001). The effect-site concentration at recovery of consciousness was significantly higher with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.8 (0.4) μg.ml-1 vs 1.5 (0.2) μg.ml-1, respectively, p = 0.01). In conclusion, the effect-site concentration of propofol differs depending on the ke0, despite the use of the same pharmacokinetic model. Therefore, the ke0 should be considered when predicting loss and recovery of consciousness based on the effect-site concentration of propofol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1232-1238
Number of pages7
JournalAnaesthesia
Volume68
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2013

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Unconsciousness
Wetlands
Propofol
Pharmacokinetics
Minor Surgical Procedures
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Consciousness
General Anesthesia
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

@article{28478c5755714038838634e055501378,
title = "Influence of a modified propofol equilibration rate constant (k e0) on the effect-site concentration at loss and recovery of consciousness with the Marsh model",
abstract = "Summary This study compared the predicted effect-site concentration of propofol at loss and recovery of consciousness when using target-controlled infusion devices with the same pharmacokinetic model (Marsh) but a different plasma effect-site equilibration rate constant (ke0), the DiprifusorTM (ke0 0.26 min-1) and Base Primea™ (ke0 1.21 min-1). We studied 60 female patients undergoing minor gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia. Although the total dose of propofol and time until loss of consciousness were comparable, the effect-site concentration at loss of consciousness was significantly lower with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.2 (0.3) μg.ml-1 vs 4.5 (0.9) μg.ml-1, respectively, p < 0.001). The effect-site concentration at recovery of consciousness was significantly higher with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.8 (0.4) μg.ml-1 vs 1.5 (0.2) μg.ml-1, respectively, p = 0.01). In conclusion, the effect-site concentration of propofol differs depending on the ke0, despite the use of the same pharmacokinetic model. Therefore, the ke0 should be considered when predicting loss and recovery of consciousness based on the effect-site concentration of propofol.",
author = "Jeong-Hwa Seo and Goo, {E. K.} and Song, {In Ae} and Park, {Sang Hyun} and Park, {Hee Pyoung} and Jeon, {Young Tae} and Jung-Won Hwang",
year = "2013",
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T1 - Influence of a modified propofol equilibration rate constant (k e0) on the effect-site concentration at loss and recovery of consciousness with the Marsh model

AU - Seo, Jeong-Hwa

AU - Goo, E. K.

AU - Song, In Ae

AU - Park, Sang Hyun

AU - Park, Hee Pyoung

AU - Jeon, Young Tae

AU - Hwang, Jung-Won

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - Summary This study compared the predicted effect-site concentration of propofol at loss and recovery of consciousness when using target-controlled infusion devices with the same pharmacokinetic model (Marsh) but a different plasma effect-site equilibration rate constant (ke0), the DiprifusorTM (ke0 0.26 min-1) and Base Primea™ (ke0 1.21 min-1). We studied 60 female patients undergoing minor gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia. Although the total dose of propofol and time until loss of consciousness were comparable, the effect-site concentration at loss of consciousness was significantly lower with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.2 (0.3) μg.ml-1 vs 4.5 (0.9) μg.ml-1, respectively, p < 0.001). The effect-site concentration at recovery of consciousness was significantly higher with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.8 (0.4) μg.ml-1 vs 1.5 (0.2) μg.ml-1, respectively, p = 0.01). In conclusion, the effect-site concentration of propofol differs depending on the ke0, despite the use of the same pharmacokinetic model. Therefore, the ke0 should be considered when predicting loss and recovery of consciousness based on the effect-site concentration of propofol.

AB - Summary This study compared the predicted effect-site concentration of propofol at loss and recovery of consciousness when using target-controlled infusion devices with the same pharmacokinetic model (Marsh) but a different plasma effect-site equilibration rate constant (ke0), the DiprifusorTM (ke0 0.26 min-1) and Base Primea™ (ke0 1.21 min-1). We studied 60 female patients undergoing minor gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia. Although the total dose of propofol and time until loss of consciousness were comparable, the effect-site concentration at loss of consciousness was significantly lower with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.2 (0.3) μg.ml-1 vs 4.5 (0.9) μg.ml-1, respectively, p < 0.001). The effect-site concentration at recovery of consciousness was significantly higher with the Diprifusor than with the Base Primea (1.8 (0.4) μg.ml-1 vs 1.5 (0.2) μg.ml-1, respectively, p = 0.01). In conclusion, the effect-site concentration of propofol differs depending on the ke0, despite the use of the same pharmacokinetic model. Therefore, the ke0 should be considered when predicting loss and recovery of consciousness based on the effect-site concentration of propofol.

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