Incidence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma Development After Bilateral Congenital Cataract Surgery in Microphthalmic Eyes

Jeong Ah Kim, Sang Yoon Lee, Ki Ho Park, Young Suk Yu, Jin Wook Jeoung

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence and risk of glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery in microphthalmic eyes. Design: Retrospective, observational case series. Methods: SUBJECTS: Children with microphthalmic eyes who had undergone surgery for bilateral congenital cataract within 6 months of birth and been followed up for at least 5 years. PROCEDURES: Review of medical records at our institution. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Probability of an eye's developing glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery and associated risk factors. Results: Thirty-eight eyes of 19 children with bilateral congenital cataract were included. The mean age at surgery was 3.2 ± 1.7 months, and the mean follow-up duration was 7.79 ± 2.61 years. After cataract surgery, 11 eyes (29.0%) developed glaucoma at the age of 4.0 ± 1.4 years. Three of these eyes underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation surgery. The probability of an eye's developing glaucoma was estimated to be 32.0% by 10 years after surgery. In a multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly associated with glaucoma development (odds ratio = 0.364, P = .025). Age at the time of cataract surgery, corneal diameter, and aphakia did not affect the risk of glaucoma (P > .10). Eyes without glaucoma had a better final visual outcome than those with glaucoma (0.75 ± 0.60 and 1.47 ± 1.10 logMAR, respectively, P = .049). Conclusions: The long-term cumulative risk of postoperative glaucoma development was 32.0% by 10 years after bilateral congenital cataract surgery. Because the risk of developing glaucoma persists for several years after surgery, careful monitoring and control of intraocular pressure is needed to preserve vision in such patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume208
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

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Glaucoma
Cataract
Incidence
Aphakia
Intraocular Pressure
Medical Records
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Parturition

Cite this

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title = "Incidence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma Development After Bilateral Congenital Cataract Surgery in Microphthalmic Eyes",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence and risk of glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery in microphthalmic eyes. Design: Retrospective, observational case series. Methods: SUBJECTS: Children with microphthalmic eyes who had undergone surgery for bilateral congenital cataract within 6 months of birth and been followed up for at least 5 years. PROCEDURES: Review of medical records at our institution. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Probability of an eye's developing glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery and associated risk factors. Results: Thirty-eight eyes of 19 children with bilateral congenital cataract were included. The mean age at surgery was 3.2 ± 1.7 months, and the mean follow-up duration was 7.79 ± 2.61 years. After cataract surgery, 11 eyes (29.0{\%}) developed glaucoma at the age of 4.0 ± 1.4 years. Three of these eyes underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation surgery. The probability of an eye's developing glaucoma was estimated to be 32.0{\%} by 10 years after surgery. In a multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly associated with glaucoma development (odds ratio = 0.364, P = .025). Age at the time of cataract surgery, corneal diameter, and aphakia did not affect the risk of glaucoma (P > .10). Eyes without glaucoma had a better final visual outcome than those with glaucoma (0.75 ± 0.60 and 1.47 ± 1.10 logMAR, respectively, P = .049). Conclusions: The long-term cumulative risk of postoperative glaucoma development was 32.0{\%} by 10 years after bilateral congenital cataract surgery. Because the risk of developing glaucoma persists for several years after surgery, careful monitoring and control of intraocular pressure is needed to preserve vision in such patients.",
author = "Kim, {Jeong Ah} and Lee, {Sang Yoon} and Park, {Ki Ho} and Yu, {Young Suk} and Jeoung, {Jin Wook}",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma Development After Bilateral Congenital Cataract Surgery in Microphthalmic Eyes

AU - Kim, Jeong Ah

AU - Lee, Sang Yoon

AU - Park, Ki Ho

AU - Yu, Young Suk

AU - Jeoung, Jin Wook

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence and risk of glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery in microphthalmic eyes. Design: Retrospective, observational case series. Methods: SUBJECTS: Children with microphthalmic eyes who had undergone surgery for bilateral congenital cataract within 6 months of birth and been followed up for at least 5 years. PROCEDURES: Review of medical records at our institution. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Probability of an eye's developing glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery and associated risk factors. Results: Thirty-eight eyes of 19 children with bilateral congenital cataract were included. The mean age at surgery was 3.2 ± 1.7 months, and the mean follow-up duration was 7.79 ± 2.61 years. After cataract surgery, 11 eyes (29.0%) developed glaucoma at the age of 4.0 ± 1.4 years. Three of these eyes underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation surgery. The probability of an eye's developing glaucoma was estimated to be 32.0% by 10 years after surgery. In a multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly associated with glaucoma development (odds ratio = 0.364, P = .025). Age at the time of cataract surgery, corneal diameter, and aphakia did not affect the risk of glaucoma (P > .10). Eyes without glaucoma had a better final visual outcome than those with glaucoma (0.75 ± 0.60 and 1.47 ± 1.10 logMAR, respectively, P = .049). Conclusions: The long-term cumulative risk of postoperative glaucoma development was 32.0% by 10 years after bilateral congenital cataract surgery. Because the risk of developing glaucoma persists for several years after surgery, careful monitoring and control of intraocular pressure is needed to preserve vision in such patients.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence and risk of glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery in microphthalmic eyes. Design: Retrospective, observational case series. Methods: SUBJECTS: Children with microphthalmic eyes who had undergone surgery for bilateral congenital cataract within 6 months of birth and been followed up for at least 5 years. PROCEDURES: Review of medical records at our institution. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Probability of an eye's developing glaucoma after bilateral congenital cataract surgery and associated risk factors. Results: Thirty-eight eyes of 19 children with bilateral congenital cataract were included. The mean age at surgery was 3.2 ± 1.7 months, and the mean follow-up duration was 7.79 ± 2.61 years. After cataract surgery, 11 eyes (29.0%) developed glaucoma at the age of 4.0 ± 1.4 years. Three of these eyes underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation surgery. The probability of an eye's developing glaucoma was estimated to be 32.0% by 10 years after surgery. In a multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly associated with glaucoma development (odds ratio = 0.364, P = .025). Age at the time of cataract surgery, corneal diameter, and aphakia did not affect the risk of glaucoma (P > .10). Eyes without glaucoma had a better final visual outcome than those with glaucoma (0.75 ± 0.60 and 1.47 ± 1.10 logMAR, respectively, P = .049). Conclusions: The long-term cumulative risk of postoperative glaucoma development was 32.0% by 10 years after bilateral congenital cataract surgery. Because the risk of developing glaucoma persists for several years after surgery, careful monitoring and control of intraocular pressure is needed to preserve vision in such patients.

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JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

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