Incidence and Risk Factors for Early Postoperative Complications and Mortality Following Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery: Data From the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program From 2011 to 2013

Ho Joong Kim, Scott L. Zuckerman, Meghan Cerpa, Jin S. Yeom, Ronald A. Lehman, Lawrence G. Lenke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors of perioperative complications and mortality in patients undergoing adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Although ASD surgery has been associated with a relatively high complication rate, a focus on perioperative complications in a large cohort has rarely been reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the database of the 2011-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, a cohort of patients (n=1484) above 20 years and underwent ASD surgery was established by primary and other Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. The incidences of perioperative (within 30 d postsurgery) minor/major complications and mortality was investigated. Risk factors for minor/major complications and mortality were assessed using logistic regression modeling. RESULTS: Of 1484 patients undergoing ASD surgery, the overall complication rate was 15.8% (minor complications: 8.2%; major complications: 10.4%), and the mortality rate was 0.6% (9 patients). After multivariate analysis, dependent functional status [P=0.003; odds ratios (ORs), 4.838], anterior or anterior+posterior approaches (P=0.001; OR, 2.022), and prolonged operative time (>5 h) (P=0.004; OR, 1.821) were associated with an increased risk of minor complications. Male sex (P=0.013; OR, 1.567), osteotomy procedure (P=0.008; OR, 1.674) and prolonged operative time (>5 h) (P<0.001; OR, 2.142) were associated with an increased risk of major complications. The American Society of Anesthesiologists 4 status (P=0.009; OR, 34.697) was a strong risk factor for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: After ASD surgery, the rates of minor complications, major complications, and mortality was 8.2%, 10.4%, and 0.6%, respectively. While mortality depended on patient physical status represented by the American Society of Anesthesiologists 4, minor and major complications were associated with male sex, dependent functional status, and surgical factors such as osteotomy procedure, prolonged operative time (>5 h), and having an anterior surgical approach. Therefore, this information may be helpful in surgical counseling and preoperative surgical planning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E566-E574
JournalClinical Spine Surgery
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Incidence and Risk Factors for Early Postoperative Complications and Mortality Following Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery: Data From the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program From 2011 to 2013'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this