In vitro characterization of a magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device

Hee Chan Kim, G. B. Bearnson, P. S. Khanwilkar, D. B. Olsen, E. H. Maslen, P. E. Allaire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device using magnetic bearings was developed aiming at an implantable ventricular assist device. The main advantage of this device includes no mechanical wear and minimal chance of blood trauma such, as thrombosis and hemolysis, because there is no mechanical contact between the stationary and rotating parts. The total system consists of two subsystems: the centrifugal pump and the magnetic bearing. The centrifugal pump is comprised of a 4 vane logarithmic spiral radial flow impeller and a brushless DC motor with slotless stator, driven by the back emf commutation scheme. Two radial and one thrust magnetic bearing that dynamically controls the position of the rotor in a radial and axial direction, respectively, contains magnetic coils, the rotor's position sensors, and feedback electronic control system. The magnetic bearing system was able to successfully suspend a 365.5 g rotating part in space and sustain it for up to 5000 rpm of rotation. Average force-current square factor of the magnetic bearing was measured as 0.48 and 0.44 (kg-f/Amp2) for radial and thrust bearing, respectively. The integrated system demonstrated adequate performance in mock circulation tests by providing a 6 L/min flow rate against 100 mmHg differential pressure at 2300 rpm. Based on these in vitro performance test results, long-term clinical application of the magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device is very promising after system optimization with a hybrid system using both active (electro-magnet) and passive (permanent magnets) magnet bearings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1995

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Magnetic bearings
Heart-Assist Devices
Magnets
Thrust bearings
Centrifugal pumps
Hemolysis
Bearings (structural)
Rotors
Thrombosis
Brushless DC motors
Radial flow
Electric commutation
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies
Hybrid systems
Stators
Permanent magnets
Wounds and Injuries
Blood
Flow rate

Cite this

Kim, Hee Chan ; Bearnson, G. B. ; Khanwilkar, P. S. ; Olsen, D. B. ; Maslen, E. H. ; Allaire, P. E. / In vitro characterization of a magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device. In: ASAIO Journal. 1995 ; Vol. 41, No. 3.
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In vitro characterization of a magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device. / Kim, Hee Chan; Bearnson, G. B.; Khanwilkar, P. S.; Olsen, D. B.; Maslen, E. H.; Allaire, P. E.

In: ASAIO Journal, Vol. 41, No. 3, 01.01.1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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