In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Whitlockite Biocompatibility: Comparative Study with Hydroxyapatite and β-Tricalcium Phosphate

Hae Lin Jang, Guang Bin Zheng, Jungha Park, Hwan D. Kim, Hae Ri Baek, Hye Kyoung Lee, Keunho Lee, Heung Nam Han, Choon Ki Lee, Nathaniel S. Hwang, Jae Hyup Lee, Ki Tae Nam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomimicking ceramics have been developed to induce efficient recovery of damaged hard tissues. Among them, calcium phosphate-based bioceramics have been the most widely used because of their similar composition with human hard tissue and excellent biocompatibilities. However, the incomplete understanding of entire inorganic phases in natural bone has limited the recreation of complete bone compositions. In this work, broad biomedical evaluation of whitlockite (WH: Ca18Mg2(HPO4)2(PO4)12), which is the secondary inorganic phase in bone, is conducted to better understand human hard tissue and to seek potential application as a biomaterial. Based on the recently developed gram-scale method for synthesizing WH nanoparticles, the properties of WH as a material for cellular scaffolding and bone implants are assessed and compared to those of hydroxyapatite (HAP: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP: β-Ca3(PO4)2). WH-reinforced composite scaffolds facilitate bone-specific differentiation compared to HAP-reinforced composite scaffolds. Additionally, WH implants induce similar or better bone regeneration in calvarial defects in a rat model compared to HAP and β-TCP implants, with intermediate resorbability. New findings of the properties of WH that distinguish it from HAP and β-TCP are significant in understanding human hard tissue, mimicking bone tissue at the nanoscale and designing functional bioceramics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-136
Number of pages9
JournalAdvanced Healthcare Materials
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Durapatite
Biocompatibility
Hydroxyapatite
Bone
Phosphates
Bone and Bones
Tissue
Bioceramics
Scaffolds
Recreation
Bone Regeneration
Ceramics
Biocompatible Materials
Nanoparticles
Composite materials
Calcium phosphate
whitlockite
tricalcium phosphate
In Vitro Techniques
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Bioceramics
  • Bone implants
  • Hydroxyapatite
  • Whitlockite
  • β-tricalcium phosphate

Cite this

Jang, Hae Lin ; Zheng, Guang Bin ; Park, Jungha ; Kim, Hwan D. ; Baek, Hae Ri ; Lee, Hye Kyoung ; Lee, Keunho ; Han, Heung Nam ; Lee, Choon Ki ; Hwang, Nathaniel S. ; Lee, Jae Hyup ; Nam, Ki Tae. / In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Whitlockite Biocompatibility : Comparative Study with Hydroxyapatite and β-Tricalcium Phosphate. In: Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2016 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 128-136.
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In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Whitlockite Biocompatibility : Comparative Study with Hydroxyapatite and β-Tricalcium Phosphate. / Jang, Hae Lin; Zheng, Guang Bin; Park, Jungha; Kim, Hwan D.; Baek, Hae Ri; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Keunho; Han, Heung Nam; Lee, Choon Ki; Hwang, Nathaniel S.; Lee, Jae Hyup; Nam, Ki Tae.

In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 128-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Comparative Study with Hydroxyapatite and β-Tricalcium Phosphate

AU - Jang, Hae Lin

AU - Zheng, Guang Bin

AU - Park, Jungha

AU - Kim, Hwan D.

AU - Baek, Hae Ri

AU - Lee, Hye Kyoung

AU - Lee, Keunho

AU - Han, Heung Nam

AU - Lee, Choon Ki

AU - Hwang, Nathaniel S.

AU - Lee, Jae Hyup

AU - Nam, Ki Tae

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