Hyperuricemia is associated with acute kidney injury and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for high morbidity and mortality in several diseases. However, the relationship between uric acid (UA) and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality remain unresolved in hospitalized patients. Methods: Data from 18 444 hospitalized patients were retrospectively reviewed. The odds ratio (OR) for AKI and the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated based on the UA quartiles after adjustment for multiple variables. All analyses were performed after stratification by sex. Results: The fourth quartile group (male, UA > 6.7 mg/dL; female, UA > 5.4 mg/dL) showed a higher risk of AKI compared with the first quartile group (male, UA < 4.5 mg/dL; female, UA < 3.6 mg/dL), with the following OR: 3.2 (2.55–4.10) in males (P < 0.001); and 3.1 (2.40–4.19) in females (P < 0.001). There were more patients who did not recover from AKI in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, with the following OR: 2.0 (1.32–3.04) in males (P = 0.001) and 2.4 (1.43–3.96) in females (P = 0.001). The fourth quartile group had a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with the first quartile group, with the following HR: 1.4 (1.20–1.58) in males (P < 0.001) and 1.2 (1.03–1.46) in females (P = 0.019). The in-hospital mortality risk was also higher in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, which was significant only in males (OR, 2.1 (1.33–3.31) (P = 0.002)). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia increases the risks of AKI and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)718-724
Number of pages7
JournalNephrology
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2019

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Hyperuricemia
Uric Acid
Acute Kidney Injury
Mortality
Odds Ratio
Hospital Mortality
Morbidity

Keywords

  • acute kidney injury
  • hyperuricemia
  • mortality
  • survival
  • uric acid

Cite this

@article{fa7eab36950e436e912ee23dd817dcc9,
title = "Hyperuricemia is associated with acute kidney injury and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients",
abstract = "Aim: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for high morbidity and mortality in several diseases. However, the relationship between uric acid (UA) and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality remain unresolved in hospitalized patients. Methods: Data from 18 444 hospitalized patients were retrospectively reviewed. The odds ratio (OR) for AKI and the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated based on the UA quartiles after adjustment for multiple variables. All analyses were performed after stratification by sex. Results: The fourth quartile group (male, UA > 6.7 mg/dL; female, UA > 5.4 mg/dL) showed a higher risk of AKI compared with the first quartile group (male, UA < 4.5 mg/dL; female, UA < 3.6 mg/dL), with the following OR: 3.2 (2.55–4.10) in males (P < 0.001); and 3.1 (2.40–4.19) in females (P < 0.001). There were more patients who did not recover from AKI in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, with the following OR: 2.0 (1.32–3.04) in males (P = 0.001) and 2.4 (1.43–3.96) in females (P = 0.001). The fourth quartile group had a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with the first quartile group, with the following HR: 1.4 (1.20–1.58) in males (P < 0.001) and 1.2 (1.03–1.46) in females (P = 0.019). The in-hospital mortality risk was also higher in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, which was significant only in males (OR, 2.1 (1.33–3.31) (P = 0.002)). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia increases the risks of AKI and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients.",
keywords = "acute kidney injury, hyperuricemia, mortality, survival, uric acid",
author = "Kang, {Min Woo} and Chin, {Ho Jun} and Kwon-Wook Joo and Na, {Ki Young} and Sejoong Kim and Han, {Seung Seok}",
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Hyperuricemia is associated with acute kidney injury and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients. / Kang, Min Woo; Chin, Ho Jun; Joo, Kwon-Wook; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Sejoong; Han, Seung Seok.

In: Nephrology, Vol. 24, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 718-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hyperuricemia is associated with acute kidney injury and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients

AU - Kang, Min Woo

AU - Chin, Ho Jun

AU - Joo, Kwon-Wook

AU - Na, Ki Young

AU - Kim, Sejoong

AU - Han, Seung Seok

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Aim: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for high morbidity and mortality in several diseases. However, the relationship between uric acid (UA) and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality remain unresolved in hospitalized patients. Methods: Data from 18 444 hospitalized patients were retrospectively reviewed. The odds ratio (OR) for AKI and the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated based on the UA quartiles after adjustment for multiple variables. All analyses were performed after stratification by sex. Results: The fourth quartile group (male, UA > 6.7 mg/dL; female, UA > 5.4 mg/dL) showed a higher risk of AKI compared with the first quartile group (male, UA < 4.5 mg/dL; female, UA < 3.6 mg/dL), with the following OR: 3.2 (2.55–4.10) in males (P < 0.001); and 3.1 (2.40–4.19) in females (P < 0.001). There were more patients who did not recover from AKI in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, with the following OR: 2.0 (1.32–3.04) in males (P = 0.001) and 2.4 (1.43–3.96) in females (P = 0.001). The fourth quartile group had a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with the first quartile group, with the following HR: 1.4 (1.20–1.58) in males (P < 0.001) and 1.2 (1.03–1.46) in females (P = 0.019). The in-hospital mortality risk was also higher in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, which was significant only in males (OR, 2.1 (1.33–3.31) (P = 0.002)). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia increases the risks of AKI and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients.

AB - Aim: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for high morbidity and mortality in several diseases. However, the relationship between uric acid (UA) and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality remain unresolved in hospitalized patients. Methods: Data from 18 444 hospitalized patients were retrospectively reviewed. The odds ratio (OR) for AKI and the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated based on the UA quartiles after adjustment for multiple variables. All analyses were performed after stratification by sex. Results: The fourth quartile group (male, UA > 6.7 mg/dL; female, UA > 5.4 mg/dL) showed a higher risk of AKI compared with the first quartile group (male, UA < 4.5 mg/dL; female, UA < 3.6 mg/dL), with the following OR: 3.2 (2.55–4.10) in males (P < 0.001); and 3.1 (2.40–4.19) in females (P < 0.001). There were more patients who did not recover from AKI in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, with the following OR: 2.0 (1.32–3.04) in males (P = 0.001) and 2.4 (1.43–3.96) in females (P = 0.001). The fourth quartile group had a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with the first quartile group, with the following HR: 1.4 (1.20–1.58) in males (P < 0.001) and 1.2 (1.03–1.46) in females (P = 0.019). The in-hospital mortality risk was also higher in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile, which was significant only in males (OR, 2.1 (1.33–3.31) (P = 0.002)). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia increases the risks of AKI and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients.

KW - acute kidney injury

KW - hyperuricemia

KW - mortality

KW - survival

KW - uric acid

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DO - 10.1111/nep.13559

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VL - 24

SP - 718

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JO - Nephrology

JF - Nephrology

SN - 1320-5358

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