Hydrostatic Versus Oleic Acid-Induced Pulmonary Edema: High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in the Pig Lung

Jung Gi Im, Yun Jung Yu, Joong Mo Ahn, Man Chung Han, Yong Suk Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives. We evaluated the differences between combined hydrostatic and hypervolemic edema and oleic acid-induced edema on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. Methods. Twelve anesthetized and ventilated pigs were studied. Hydrostatic edema was induced by ligation of the abdominal aorta and infusion of normal saline (n = 4); permeability edema was induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid (n = 4). Four pigs were studied as normal controls. Serial scans were obtained before and after induction of edema at a constant position in the caudal lobe of the lung. The distribution of edema was assessed visually. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the pulmonary artery and vein were measured both at the lobar and segmental levels. Results. Gravity-dependent opacity, peribronchovascular fluid collection, prominent centrilobular core, thickening of the interlobular septa, and air-space consolidation at the dependent site were the sequential HRCT findings of hydrostatic edema. Randomly distributed, diffuse patchy high attenuation areas with a tendency for predilection in the subpleural and peripheral areas of the secondary lobule were the findings of oleic acidinduced edema. Hydrostatic edema increased the mean CSAs of the lobular vein by 137.8% ± 78.7, but oleic acid edema decreased the mean CSAs by 33.2% ± 22.7. Changes in the mean CSAs of the pulmonary arteries were not significant. The mean vein-to-artery ratio increased significantly in hydrostatic edema but decreased in oleic acid edema. Conclusion. HRCT findings for hydrostatic and oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema differed both in distribution of edema and in pulmonary vascular response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-372
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1994

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Edema
Oleic Acid
Edema
Swine
Tomography
Lung
Pulmonary Artery
Veins
Pulmonary Veins
Abdominal Aorta
Gravitation
Intravenous Injections
Ligation
Blood Vessels
Permeability
Arteries
Air

Keywords

  • Pulmonary edema
  • high-resolution computed tomography
  • oleic acid

Cite this

Im, Jung Gi ; Yu, Yun Jung ; Ahn, Joong Mo ; Han, Man Chung ; Oh, Yong Suk. / Hydrostatic Versus Oleic Acid-Induced Pulmonary Edema : High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in the Pig Lung. In: Academic Radiology. 1994 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 364-372.
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abstract = "Rationale and Objectives. We evaluated the differences between combined hydrostatic and hypervolemic edema and oleic acid-induced edema on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. Methods. Twelve anesthetized and ventilated pigs were studied. Hydrostatic edema was induced by ligation of the abdominal aorta and infusion of normal saline (n = 4); permeability edema was induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid (n = 4). Four pigs were studied as normal controls. Serial scans were obtained before and after induction of edema at a constant position in the caudal lobe of the lung. The distribution of edema was assessed visually. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the pulmonary artery and vein were measured both at the lobar and segmental levels. Results. Gravity-dependent opacity, peribronchovascular fluid collection, prominent centrilobular core, thickening of the interlobular septa, and air-space consolidation at the dependent site were the sequential HRCT findings of hydrostatic edema. Randomly distributed, diffuse patchy high attenuation areas with a tendency for predilection in the subpleural and peripheral areas of the secondary lobule were the findings of oleic acidinduced edema. Hydrostatic edema increased the mean CSAs of the lobular vein by 137.8{\%} ± 78.7, but oleic acid edema decreased the mean CSAs by 33.2{\%} ± 22.7. Changes in the mean CSAs of the pulmonary arteries were not significant. The mean vein-to-artery ratio increased significantly in hydrostatic edema but decreased in oleic acid edema. Conclusion. HRCT findings for hydrostatic and oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema differed both in distribution of edema and in pulmonary vascular response.",
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Hydrostatic Versus Oleic Acid-Induced Pulmonary Edema : High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in the Pig Lung. / Im, Jung Gi; Yu, Yun Jung; Ahn, Joong Mo; Han, Man Chung; Oh, Yong Suk.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.01.1994, p. 364-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Hydrostatic Versus Oleic Acid-Induced Pulmonary Edema

T2 - High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in the Pig Lung

AU - Im, Jung Gi

AU - Yu, Yun Jung

AU - Ahn, Joong Mo

AU - Han, Man Chung

AU - Oh, Yong Suk

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Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - Rationale and Objectives. We evaluated the differences between combined hydrostatic and hypervolemic edema and oleic acid-induced edema on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. Methods. Twelve anesthetized and ventilated pigs were studied. Hydrostatic edema was induced by ligation of the abdominal aorta and infusion of normal saline (n = 4); permeability edema was induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid (n = 4). Four pigs were studied as normal controls. Serial scans were obtained before and after induction of edema at a constant position in the caudal lobe of the lung. The distribution of edema was assessed visually. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the pulmonary artery and vein were measured both at the lobar and segmental levels. Results. Gravity-dependent opacity, peribronchovascular fluid collection, prominent centrilobular core, thickening of the interlobular septa, and air-space consolidation at the dependent site were the sequential HRCT findings of hydrostatic edema. Randomly distributed, diffuse patchy high attenuation areas with a tendency for predilection in the subpleural and peripheral areas of the secondary lobule were the findings of oleic acidinduced edema. Hydrostatic edema increased the mean CSAs of the lobular vein by 137.8% ± 78.7, but oleic acid edema decreased the mean CSAs by 33.2% ± 22.7. Changes in the mean CSAs of the pulmonary arteries were not significant. The mean vein-to-artery ratio increased significantly in hydrostatic edema but decreased in oleic acid edema. Conclusion. HRCT findings for hydrostatic and oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema differed both in distribution of edema and in pulmonary vascular response.

AB - Rationale and Objectives. We evaluated the differences between combined hydrostatic and hypervolemic edema and oleic acid-induced edema on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. Methods. Twelve anesthetized and ventilated pigs were studied. Hydrostatic edema was induced by ligation of the abdominal aorta and infusion of normal saline (n = 4); permeability edema was induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid (n = 4). Four pigs were studied as normal controls. Serial scans were obtained before and after induction of edema at a constant position in the caudal lobe of the lung. The distribution of edema was assessed visually. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the pulmonary artery and vein were measured both at the lobar and segmental levels. Results. Gravity-dependent opacity, peribronchovascular fluid collection, prominent centrilobular core, thickening of the interlobular septa, and air-space consolidation at the dependent site were the sequential HRCT findings of hydrostatic edema. Randomly distributed, diffuse patchy high attenuation areas with a tendency for predilection in the subpleural and peripheral areas of the secondary lobule were the findings of oleic acidinduced edema. Hydrostatic edema increased the mean CSAs of the lobular vein by 137.8% ± 78.7, but oleic acid edema decreased the mean CSAs by 33.2% ± 22.7. Changes in the mean CSAs of the pulmonary arteries were not significant. The mean vein-to-artery ratio increased significantly in hydrostatic edema but decreased in oleic acid edema. Conclusion. HRCT findings for hydrostatic and oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema differed both in distribution of edema and in pulmonary vascular response.

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