Fruit Intake and Changes of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in People with Obesity

Shiao Shih Liu, Ju Young Kim, Jung Ha Park, Sohye Kim, Kiheon Lee, Woo Kyung Bae, Kee Hyuck Lee, Jong Soo Han, Hyejin Lee, Se Young Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to explore the relationship between fruit intake, changes in fruit intake, and changes in cardiometabolic factors in people with obesity. Methods: A total of 21,270 subjects (8,718 men, 12,552 women) aged 40 years and over, from the Korean-based Genome and Epidemiology Study, were followed up for an average of 4.4 years. Fruit intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline and the second follow-up. The beta coefficient and confidence intervals for changes in cardiometabolic risk factors according to fruit consumption were calculated using a linear regression model. Results: In men, the abdominal circumference decreased with changes in fruit intake (P=0.029). Fruit intake and increased fruit intake in men were associated with a lower systolic blood pressure (P=0.012 and P=0.02, respectively) and lower triglyceride levels (P=0.002 and P<0.001, respectively). In women, abdominal circumference decreased with both fruit intake and increased fruit intake (P<0.001 and P=0.013, respectively). Systolic blood pressure and triglycerides tended to decrease only with fruit intake (P=0.048 and P<0.001, respectively). Unlike in men, fasting blood glucose tended to decrease in women with both fruit intake and increased fruit intake (P=0.011 and P=0.005, respectively). Conclusion: Fruit intake and increased fruit intake may have beneficial effects on cardiometabolic risk factors among individuals who are obese.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)382-389
Number of pages8
JournalKorean Journal of Family Medicine
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Fruit
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Obesity

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