Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users

Seog Ju Kim, In Kyoon Lyoo, Jaeuk Hwang, Young Hoon Sung, Ho Young Lee, Dong Soo Lee, Do Un Jeong, Perry F. Renshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) and their potential gender differences in abstinent methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Relative rCMRglc, as measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, and frontal executive functions, as assessed by Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), were compared between 35 abstinent MA users and 21 healthy comparison subjects. In addition, male and female MA users and their gender-matched comparison subjects were compared to investigate potential gender differences. MA users had lower rCMRglc levels in the right superior frontal white matter and more perseveration and nonperseveration errors in the WCST, relative to healthy comparison subjects. Relative rCMRglc in the frontal white matter correlated with number of errors in the WCST in MA users. In the subanalysis for gender differences, lower rCMRglc in the frontal white matter and more errors in the WCST were found only in male MA users, not in female MA users, relative to their gender-matched comparison subjects. The current findings suggest that MA use causes persistent hypometabolism in the frontal white matter and impairment in frontal executive function. Our findings also suggest that the neurotoxic effect of MA on frontal lobes of the brain might be more prominent in men than in women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1383-1391
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2005

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Glucose
Executive Function
Healthy Volunteers
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Frontal Lobe
Positron-Emission Tomography
White Matter
Brain

Keywords

  • Brain mapping
  • Frontal lobe
  • Methamphetamine
  • Neuropsychological tests
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Sex characteristics

Cite this

Kim, Seog Ju ; Lyoo, In Kyoon ; Hwang, Jaeuk ; Sung, Young Hoon ; Lee, Ho Young ; Lee, Dong Soo ; Jeong, Do Un ; Renshaw, Perry F. / Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2005 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 1383-1391.
@article{be1d1bbddd9c4eb7b0f9cdd70085793e,
title = "Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users",
abstract = "Changes in relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) and their potential gender differences in abstinent methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Relative rCMRglc, as measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, and frontal executive functions, as assessed by Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), were compared between 35 abstinent MA users and 21 healthy comparison subjects. In addition, male and female MA users and their gender-matched comparison subjects were compared to investigate potential gender differences. MA users had lower rCMRglc levels in the right superior frontal white matter and more perseveration and nonperseveration errors in the WCST, relative to healthy comparison subjects. Relative rCMRglc in the frontal white matter correlated with number of errors in the WCST in MA users. In the subanalysis for gender differences, lower rCMRglc in the frontal white matter and more errors in the WCST were found only in male MA users, not in female MA users, relative to their gender-matched comparison subjects. The current findings suggest that MA use causes persistent hypometabolism in the frontal white matter and impairment in frontal executive function. Our findings also suggest that the neurotoxic effect of MA on frontal lobes of the brain might be more prominent in men than in women.",
keywords = "Brain mapping, Frontal lobe, Methamphetamine, Neuropsychological tests, Positron emission tomography, Sex characteristics",
author = "Kim, {Seog Ju} and Lyoo, {In Kyoon} and Jaeuk Hwang and Sung, {Young Hoon} and Lee, {Ho Young} and Lee, {Dong Soo} and Jeong, {Do Un} and Renshaw, {Perry F.}",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/sj.npp.1300699",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1383--1391",
journal = "Neuropsychopharmacology",
issn = "0893-133X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

Kim, SJ, Lyoo, IK, Hwang, J, Sung, YH, Lee, HY, Lee, DS, Jeong, DU & Renshaw, PF 2005, 'Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users', Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 1383-1391. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.npp.1300699

Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users. / Kim, Seog Ju; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Hwang, Jaeuk; Sung, Young Hoon; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Do Un; Renshaw, Perry F.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.07.2005, p. 1383-1391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frontal glucose hypometabolism in abstinent methamphetamine users

AU - Kim, Seog Ju

AU - Lyoo, In Kyoon

AU - Hwang, Jaeuk

AU - Sung, Young Hoon

AU - Lee, Ho Young

AU - Lee, Dong Soo

AU - Jeong, Do Un

AU - Renshaw, Perry F.

PY - 2005/7/1

Y1 - 2005/7/1

N2 - Changes in relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) and their potential gender differences in abstinent methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Relative rCMRglc, as measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, and frontal executive functions, as assessed by Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), were compared between 35 abstinent MA users and 21 healthy comparison subjects. In addition, male and female MA users and their gender-matched comparison subjects were compared to investigate potential gender differences. MA users had lower rCMRglc levels in the right superior frontal white matter and more perseveration and nonperseveration errors in the WCST, relative to healthy comparison subjects. Relative rCMRglc in the frontal white matter correlated with number of errors in the WCST in MA users. In the subanalysis for gender differences, lower rCMRglc in the frontal white matter and more errors in the WCST were found only in male MA users, not in female MA users, relative to their gender-matched comparison subjects. The current findings suggest that MA use causes persistent hypometabolism in the frontal white matter and impairment in frontal executive function. Our findings also suggest that the neurotoxic effect of MA on frontal lobes of the brain might be more prominent in men than in women.

AB - Changes in relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) and their potential gender differences in abstinent methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Relative rCMRglc, as measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, and frontal executive functions, as assessed by Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), were compared between 35 abstinent MA users and 21 healthy comparison subjects. In addition, male and female MA users and their gender-matched comparison subjects were compared to investigate potential gender differences. MA users had lower rCMRglc levels in the right superior frontal white matter and more perseveration and nonperseveration errors in the WCST, relative to healthy comparison subjects. Relative rCMRglc in the frontal white matter correlated with number of errors in the WCST in MA users. In the subanalysis for gender differences, lower rCMRglc in the frontal white matter and more errors in the WCST were found only in male MA users, not in female MA users, relative to their gender-matched comparison subjects. The current findings suggest that MA use causes persistent hypometabolism in the frontal white matter and impairment in frontal executive function. Our findings also suggest that the neurotoxic effect of MA on frontal lobes of the brain might be more prominent in men than in women.

KW - Brain mapping

KW - Frontal lobe

KW - Methamphetamine

KW - Neuropsychological tests

KW - Positron emission tomography

KW - Sex characteristics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20544477709&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.npp.1300699

DO - 10.1038/sj.npp.1300699

M3 - Article

C2 - 15726115

AN - SCOPUS:20544477709

VL - 30

SP - 1383

EP - 1391

JO - Neuropsychopharmacology

JF - Neuropsychopharmacology

SN - 0893-133X

IS - 7

ER -